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23 votes
Accepted

Fourth person (in Slavey language)

The fourth person is a (rare) synonym for the obviative. In languages with this feature, when there are two third-person referents and one of them is less salient, the less salient one may be marked ...
WavesWashSands's user avatar
22 votes

Fourth person (in Slavey language)

As a layman in linguistics I found this explanation pretty illuminating: In English, when we have a non-SAP (speech act participants) involved in the discourse, there is the potential for ambiguity. ...
Andrew Savinykh's user avatar
6 votes

Have other language families been mapped like Proto-Indo-European has?

Yes, there are very many researchers working to reconstruct proto-languages other than Indo-European. There are a number of languages that are not clearly related to any other language (e.g. ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.2k
5 votes

Can Native Americans of different linguistic background still communicate using sign language?

Even assuming you're only talking about North America, the answer is no. There are about 300 indigenous languages reliably attested (depending how you count them), some of which are related but many ...
Draconis's user avatar
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4 votes

Can Native Americans of different linguistic background still communicate using sign language?

You can read about it, or one, here. Plains Indian Sign language is purportedly still known by about 75 people predominantly among the Crow, Cheyenne, and Arapaho, and was employed roughly in the ...
user6726's user avatar
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3 votes
Accepted

What's a good resource where I can publish some narratives in a minority language?

The question seems to be about where one would put such materials (not how one would handle the typesetting issue). There are at least three places which don't require content review: Zenodo, Figshare,...
user6726's user avatar
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3 votes
Accepted

Derivation of Morpheme for "Raising" in NACLO Problem

This is not an easy task, if that’s all the data and information about Cupeño you’re given. Some things you can work out, but others do not seem possible to extract from just those data. As far as I ...
Janus Bahs Jacquet's user avatar
2 votes

Could the precursor to Pre-Proto-Quechua have been a monosyllabic tonal language?

This falls under the historical reconstruction of tone - not an easy job, and even more difficult if there are no contemporaneous records of the language or of discourse about the language that have ...
Michaelyus's user avatar
  • 7,516
2 votes
Accepted

Have other language families been mapped like Proto-Indo-European has?

There are a great many language families studied by linguists, and part of the demonstration of their relatedness typically involves the classification of the members of that family into subgroups. ...
Tristan's user avatar
  • 8,808
2 votes
Accepted

How dialectal/linguistic variation in Plains Indian Sign Language

Unfortunately, the book Sign Languages, Cambridge Language Surveys series, 2010, edited by Diane Brentari, which has the “Variation and change” section, doesn't cover PISL, it is about modern sign ...
Yellow Sky's user avatar
  • 18.5k
2 votes

What's a good resource where I can publish some narratives in a minority language?

Another potential archive for documentation of endangered languages is The Language Archive currently hosted by the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics at Nijmegen (The Netherlands).
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar

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