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28

Cross-culturally, names having transparent meanings is the norm. Europe, and the non-Arabic-speaking Muslim world are notable exceptions and in those cases religion is one of the big motivating factors When you have large religions with a strong scriptural tradition, people will often choose names from that scripture. If the language of that scripture is not ...


21

First, it is not just black and white. Not all English names are opaque, there are transparent names like Hope, Faith, or Grace but also Rose that are current in English and American naming. And there are also some Arabic names like Ammar or Zaynab that are opaque. But it is true that the majority of English names are opaque and speakers of English are used ...


12

Part of the reason is that people with Muslim names tend to have a better knowledge of Arabic. But most people have very little knowledge of Old English, and don't know what "Harold" or "Alfred" derive from (owing to the much more substantial change in English over versus Arabic). There is no constant source of re-connection with the ...


7

The call for minimal pairs is inappropriate, a call for evidence is appropriate. Before giving evidence you gotta say what the evidence is evidence of. The gist of your question is that perhaps, the two-segment sequence composed of /ð+ʕ/ is in all respects interchangeable with the single pharyngealized segment written /ðˁ/. Because of Arabic's root-and-...


6

As with many words in English, also a lot of proper names come from the Romans, which in turn served as a vector for Hebrew ("Michael"), Aramaic ("Thomas") and Greek ("Peter") names. Names like "Peter" probably are recognizable in the region of their origin, but not in England. There still are original English names as ...


4

rafʿ is a noun and it means(among other things) "nominative case". marfūʿ is an adjective (passive participle) from the same root; it refers to a noun which is put in the nominative case.


4

The Fayfa dialect is certainly not Mahri or even remotely related to it. Mahri is spoken hundreds of miles away in the far eastern regions of Yemen and the neighboring parts of Oman (along with a few related language and dialects, collectively referred to as Modern South Arabian). Modern South Arabian is a distinct langauge family in the Semitic group that ...


4

It's only in some languages including English that saying “thank you” means “I express gratitude to you”. In many languages something like “be thou blessed” is said instead. For example, in Russian “thank you” is спасибо (spasibo) [spɐˈsʲibə] which is actually a contraction of спаси Бо[г] meaning “save (you) God”. Arabic سَلَامَات‎ (salāmāt) is plural of ...


4

The only connection is that they mean the same thing. Spanich rincón which also means "corner" is borrowed from Arabic rukn. The English word comes from Latin via French and originally meant "horn".


3

Yes, it applies to both Modern Standard Arabic pronunciation and the Qur'an reading. It has to do with the so called 'moon' and 'sun' consonants. The 'sun' consonants are sibilants and dentals. The 'moon' consonats is everything else. The [l] of the definite article 'al- is assimilated to the 'sun' consonants and not assimilated and hence pronounced with the ...


1

Gizah, a town in Egypt...........


1

I don't believe Arabic ۃ is ever replaced with ط (t̤oʼē) in Urdu. Arabic ۃ is usually replaced with ہ (gōl hē) with the exception of a few well-known terms, such as: صلوٰۃ زکوٰۃ. Examples of Arabic words where it's replaced with ہ include کلمہ, طیّبہ, زیادہ. If you know Urdu well enough, you can read some discussion on this message board which also points to ...


1

This is a description of the assimilation of laam to the following “sun letter”. It is a description purely in terms of Arabic orthography, not of scientific phonology and phonotactics. In the word الشمس “the sun”, the laam has no diacritic and is not pronounced as /l/, while the following shiin is written (in vocalised script) with tashdiid, indicating that ...


1

It’s largely an artifact of the evolution of the language itself, and to some extent the culture of the people who speak the language. Names tend to shift less over time than other aspects of a language because they’re inherently tied to the lifetime of a person and often get reused on a generational basis, so divergence from other aspects of the language is ...


1

This is intended to refer to the dialects of the bedouin communities of eastern Egypt, the Sinai and the Negev desert. It is most closely related to the bedouin dialects of Jordan and northwestern Saudi Arabia and is the same as what Wikipedia refers to as "Northwestern Arabian Arabic". It is closer to what you would hear in the Jordanian and ...


1

Pick up a book by say, Edmund Burke, and read a page or two. Then pick up the current issue of the New York Times and read one of the editorials. That is roughly the difference between Classical Arabic and "Modern Standard Arabic". Modern Standard Arabic is just the contemporary usage of Classical Arabic. It uses the same grammar and vocabulary (...


1

If you want an English-Arabic dictionary for Classical Arabic then I recommend Lane’s lexicon or Hans wehr dictionary. If you want Classical Arabic dictionaries with only Arabic in it then I have a lot of dictionaries to recommend for you; Lisan al-Arab ( لسان العرب‎) Taj al-arus (تاج العروس) Tahdhib al-Lugha (تهذيب اللغة) Jamhara al-Lugha ( one of the five ...


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