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The online Arabic-English dictionary that reminds me most of the site you mentioned is PONS. It isn't exclusively an Arabic-English dictionary. Other language pairings are offered as well. To give you a taste of what it can offer, click on the link below: dictionary You may also like WordReference.com. Here's what it does with this same word: dictionary


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This (History SE) answer claims that the term was first used by Bishara Zalzal in an article in Al-muktataf magazine (here is a link indicating that the article exists). The report is that I used al-batriq as the Arabic name for this bird because in Latin it is named penguin which means the "chubby bird" and batriq means the same thing in Arabic ...


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mawjūd is the passive participle of the verb wajada “to find”, so its literal meaning is “having been found”. As a participle it is common in classical Arabic, but as far as I can see, in the meaning “existing” it is modern, or in case not common in the classical language. It might help if you could direct us to the mentioned link.


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It is a word in both modern standard Arabic and classical Arabic. Just because it was not mentioned in the Qur'án does not mean it is not a word. The Qur'án is not a dictionary, and it does not have every word in the Arabic language. Further proof of it being a word is the fact that other words of the same root are indeed found in the Qur'án, it is just that ...


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