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11 votes

To which degree are Western and Eastern Armenian mutually intelligible?

Eastern and Western are just two codifications, the total dialect variation within Armenian is similar to that within English and arguably much less than that within German. As noted in the other ...
Adam Bittlingmayer's user avatar
11 votes
Accepted

If the Armenian word for "foot", "otn", really comes from PIE *podm, why did the 'p' disappear?

What we see in otn isn't *p- > ∅, which isn't a rule in Armenian, but *po- > o-, which probably is. Some comparanda to support this: ordi 'child' and ortʿ 'calf', both from the o-grade of the ...
Cairnarvon's user avatar
  • 2,215
7 votes

An idea to phonetically relate Indo-European first-person singular personal pronouns

As the other answer somewhat obscurely tells you, all these words are related, but Armenian yes is not the common origin. There is also nothing particular in your question that justifies centering ...
Keelan's user avatar
  • 4,223
6 votes

"yotta" in Greek and Armenian

It is a coincidence. The prefix "yotta-" is in no way Greek. It is a modern, invented, coinage, derived from Greek ὀκτώ (okto) by a very roundabout and idiosyncratic route. Armenian յոթ (yot') ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
  • 7,464
6 votes

To which degree are Western and Eastern Armenian mutually intelligible?

There are the following differences: The current Armenian language (which is also considered as Eastern Armenian) was created by Khachatur Abovian, who is best remembered for his novel, Wounds of ...
BigGinDaHouse's user avatar
6 votes

If the Armenian word for "foot", "otn", really comes from PIE *podm, why did the 'p' disappear?

The simplest answer, Beekes 2001 p. 171, is that "*p > h- in anlaut before vowel (> zero before o)" – this is one of the Armenian sound changes. A more nuanced answer is that *p ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.1k
6 votes
Accepted

What Armenian letter is it?

It's a ligature M+N, it's even included in Unicode, ﬓ U+FB13, symbols U+FB14 – U+FB17 are four more Armenian ligatures.
Yellow Sky's user avatar
  • 18.5k
5 votes

Which cues can I listen for to distinguish spoken Georgian and Armenian?

The two languages have a similar set of sounds, and both have even intonation. But: Armenian has two r, one of which is soft, Georgian r is always the hard one. Armenian has k and q but no qʼ. ...
Meri Hovhannisyan's user avatar
5 votes

An idea to phonetically relate Indo-European first-person singular personal pronouns

You're right that all of these are (probably) related! However, it's almost certain that Modern Armenian is not the common source. Armenian is a relatively modern language (it's not attested until the ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 66.7k
4 votes

An idea to phonetically relate Indo-European first-person singular personal pronouns

Since this question is likely to disappear soon into the limbo of unspeakable queries I will restrict myself to a brief answer. The Armenian word for the 1st person singular pronoun is /es/, which in ...
fdb's user avatar
  • 24.2k
2 votes

Does (Old) Armenian have examples of ձ / զ (dz / z) alteration?

I can’t find one, but it is hard to say that it never ever happened, without an exhaustive search. (“Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.”) Etymologically ձ evolved from a few different ...
Adam Bittlingmayer's user avatar
2 votes

What is this language?

This is Armenian. I'm failing to translate whole text, though it's not a dialect, on the contrary, it seems to me to be a literary language, quite standard, it's just that I'm failing to understand 10%...
shabunc's user avatar
  • 919
1 vote

Are there any loanwords between Turkish and Armenian?

Yes, there are a great many, especially in spoken language and in regional and archaic dialects. On average, there are more Turkish terms in spoken Armenian than Armenian in Turkish, and many many ...
Adam Bittlingmayer's user avatar

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