10 votes

To which degree are Western and Eastern Armenian mutually intelligible?

Eastern and Western are just two codifications, the total dialect variation within Armenian is similar to that within English and arguably much less than that within German. As noted in the other ...
8 votes

What is this language?

I'm fairly sure that the language is Armenian. For example, the second word on the top line is միշտ (mishd) meaning "always", and the fourth line has the words քեզ (kez) "you" and մարդ (mard) "man". ...
  • 1,367
7 votes

An idea to phonetically relate Indo-European first-person singular personal pronouns

As the other answer somewhat obscurely tells you, all these words are related, but Armenian yes is not the common origin. There is also nothing particular in your question that justifies centering ...
  • 3,268
6 votes

"yotta" in Greek and Armenian

It is a coincidence. The prefix "yotta-" is in no way Greek. It is a modern, invented, coinage, derived from Greek ὀκτώ (okto) by a very roundabout and idiosyncratic route. Armenian յոթ (yot') ...
  • 6,744
6 votes

To which degree are Western and Eastern Armenian mutually intelligible?

There are the following differences: The current Armenian language (which is also considered as Eastern Armenian) was created by Khachatur Abovian, who is best remembered for his novel, Wounds of ...
5 votes

Which cues can I listen for to distinguish spoken Georgian and Armenian?

The two languages have a similar set of sounds, and both have even intonation. But: Armenian has two r, one of which is soft, Georgian r is always the hard one. Armenian has k and q but no qʼ. ...
5 votes

An idea to phonetically relate Indo-European first-person singular personal pronouns

You're right that all of these are (probably) related! However, it's almost certain that Modern Armenian is not the common source. Armenian is a relatively modern language (it's not attested until the ...
  • 57.5k
4 votes

An idea to phonetically relate Indo-European first-person singular personal pronouns

Since this question is likely to disappear soon into the limbo of unspeakable queries I will restrict myself to a brief answer. The Armenian word for the 1st person singular pronoun is /es/, which in ...
  • 23.1k
4 votes
Accepted

The Armenian word for "King" and it's relation to Greek ἀγαυός and Phrygian -ΟΓΑϝΟΣ

The Armenian word was borrowed from Western Middle Iranian (Parthian or Middle Persian) tāg-āwar (or tāg-āwur) “crown bearer”. It is not attested in Old Iranian languages, but one would expect either *...
  • 23.1k
3 votes

Which cues can I listen for to distinguish spoken Georgian and Armenian?

Armenian (at least Western Armenian) seems to place stress mainly on the final syllable. From the little I've read about Georgian, it seems to prefer penultimate stress. Overall, Armenian sounds much ...
  • 1,367
2 votes

What is this language?

This is Armenian. I'm failing to translate whole text, though it's not a dialect, on the contrary, it seems to me to be a literary language, quite standard, it's just that I'm failing to understand 10%...
  • 917
1 vote

Are there any loanwords between Turkish and Armenian?

Yes, there are a great many, especially in spoken language and in regional and archaic dialects. On average, there are more Turkish terms in spoken Armenian than Armenian in Turkish, and many many ...

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