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Is "illegal" an example of nasal place assimilation in English?

English doesn't have those rules: unlucky, unlikely, unwritten, unready. Those are rules of Latin, so we see them in English words that were borrowed from Latin (sometimes directly, sometimes via ...
Draconis's user avatar
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15 votes

Is "illegal" an example of nasal place assimilation in English?

Regardless of whether you consider that alternation to be part of English phonology, it is not place assimilation, it is manner assimilation. The change of /n/ to [ŋ] before velars and /n/ to [m] ...
user6726's user avatar
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9 votes

Is "illegal" an example of nasal place assimilation in English?

Other posts have covered that illegal is not "place" assimilation. The etymological origin of words starting with ill- is irrelevant to the grammar of modern English. Some words may have ...
brass tacks's user avatar
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7 votes
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Does assimilation of voice produce different phonemes, or just allophones?

There is no clear answer to the title question in general; it may depend on the sounds, or the language. (Well, unless you define "assimilation" in such a way as to explicitly refer to a ...
brass tacks's user avatar
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7 votes
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How did Gothic "𐌰𐌽𐌳𐌱𐌰𐌷𐍄𐌹" (andbahti) become Medieval Latin "ambasiator"?

I think a likly path to the "s" is through "kt" (as in ambactus) which then palatalized before j. A variety of spellings are apparently found in this word and related words such as ...
brass tacks's user avatar
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6 votes

Is "illegal" an example of nasal place assimilation in English?

Definetely not in English. The word illegal was borrowed from Latin when the assimilation already had happened. This assimilation is also not a productive process in English. As user6726 has already ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
6 votes
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Besides English, "a" and "an". which other language uses separate articles before vowels?

Yiddish shows an exact parallel to the English indefinite article. The indefinite article is אַן an before a vowel and אַ a before a vowel. Yiddish is a West Germanic language like English, but seeing ...
Tristan's user avatar
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5 votes

How can I tell the difference between types of assimilation?

This is less of an absolute classification, and more just a description of what's happening in a particular circumstance in a particular language. Assimilation means one thing is becoming more like ...
Draconis's user avatar
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5 votes

/ðæs saɪd/ versus /ɡʊb bɔɪ/ - Assimilation of place versus manner

It is questionable whether there is such a thing as "assimilation of manner" in the same sense that there is assimilation of place. Assimilation of place traditionally refers to wholesale ...
user6726's user avatar
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5 votes
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Assimilation Help

Did you make sure you have understood what assimilation means in general, not only, as you said, "in this context"? I think this task is pretty straightforward if you stick close to the definitions ...
Natalie Clarius's user avatar
4 votes
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How did French take over Walloon in Belgium?

I think you are conflating two, very different things : how a language acquires a place of social prestige and dominance, and how a language replaces another in the population. Now of course, a ...
Typhon's user avatar
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4 votes

Does assimilation of voice produce different phonemes, or just allophones?

They are called allomorphs. It refers to phonological variations of a same morpheme. See the In English suffixes section of the given wikipedia article. It gives an example of the past tense morpheme -...
Ignatius's user avatar
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4 votes

Did PIE *h3 cause voicing in any other words than the "drink" word?

Turns out there's at least one other suggested, but controversial, case of voicing by *h3, involving the "Hoffmann suffix" *-Hon- or *-h3on-. Piotr Gąsiorowski discusses it here. The same suffix may ...
TKR's user avatar
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4 votes

Examples of Umlaut in a living language

As I understand it, the essential character which you're seeking is that it is regressive suffix-to-root assimilation (not progressive, and not bidirectional), and the trigger has to actually be there....
user6726's user avatar
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4 votes

Besides English, "a" and "an". which other language uses separate articles before vowels?

Welsh does a similar thing, though with the definite article rather than the indefinite (which Welsh doesn’t have). In fact, the Welsh article uses a tripartite system: Before a vowel sound (...
Janus Bahs Jacquet's user avatar
3 votes

Besides English, "a" and "an". which other language uses separate articles before vowels?

The Hungarian definite article a changes to az before a vowel: a szék “the chair” az asztal “the table”
Yellow Sky's user avatar
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3 votes

Besides English, "a" and "an". which other language uses separate articles before vowels?

In Ancient Greek, an article ending in a vowel can merge with a word starting with a vowel, in a phenomenon called "crasis" (κρᾶσις). This doesn't happen before a consonant. For example, ὁ ...
Draconis's user avatar
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3 votes

What is a word that assimilates loanwords called?

Kazakh ету sounds like it might pattern with the concept of "light verbs" in the literature (a semantically light or empty verb that converts other parts of speech into predicates). Granted, ...
jogloran's user avatar
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3 votes

Different assimilation directions

I believe that Chomsky and Halle's SPE theory predicts progressive assimilation of voice. For English morphologically simple forms, the only way you can have a weak word initial syllable followed ...
Greg Lee's user avatar
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3 votes

Is /v/ cross-linguistically semi-voiced and powerless in devoicing preceding consonants in case of regressive assimilation? How to explain it?

I don't have an explanation from a synchronic phonetic perspective. From a diachronic and phonological perspective, /v/ in many languages, including Danish and Russian, developed from earlier /w/. ...
brass tacks's user avatar
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3 votes

How did Gothic "𐌰𐌽𐌳𐌱𐌰𐌷𐍄𐌹" (andbahti) become Medieval Latin "ambasiator"?

The shift of /k/ to /h/ is regular in Germanic (assuming that the borrowing from Celtic to Germanic is very old: i.e. pre-Grimm). But I do not see why the Romance forms should derive from Gothic, ...
fdb's user avatar
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2 votes

Examples of Umlaut in a living language

In German, umlaut is admittedly no longer productive, but it is still very much in evidence in words like Mann > Männer, Kuh > Kühe, and many more.
fdb's user avatar
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2 votes

/ðæs saɪd/ versus /ɡʊb bɔɪ/ - Assimilation of place versus manner

In good boy, /ɡʊb bɔɪ/, we see that the last consonant of good has become a /b/. In isolation the last consonant of good would be a /d/. If we give these two phonemes their Voice Place Manner labels, /...
Araucaria - him's user avatar
2 votes

The reason for a partly voiced hold in I’d

You need to frame this as a broader and testable question, and the investigation has to be conducted with some underlying theory of what might be happening. I think you can probably control speaker, ...
user6726's user avatar
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2 votes
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Sandhi vs Assimilation?

Neither term would be wrong. They aren't mutually exclusive: sandhi is broadly defined as a phonological process crossing word boundaries, while assimilation is broadly defined as a phonological ...
Draconis's user avatar
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2 votes
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What is a word that assimilates loanwords called?

Linguistic literature in typology (e.g. the World Lexicon of Grammaticalization) calls this a "pro-verb", the basic idea behind that name being that, like a pronoun, it's semantically empty ...
Aryaman's user avatar
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2 votes

Geminate consonants by total assimilation in English

First off, there is a distinction between geminates and fake geminates. Conventionally, we tend to write [tt, ss, nn] for all longish consonants, but the term "geminate" is usually reserved ...
user6726's user avatar
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1 vote
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Can /t/ get assimilated to /ʃ/?

/t/ can assimilate to /ʃ/, i.e. /tʃ/ can become [ʃʃ]. However, what is happening in that video is something totally different. This is known as "lenition", a feature of some dialects (on the ...
user6726's user avatar
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1 vote

What is a word that assimilates loanwords called?

This is too long for a comment ... The phenomenon is not unique to the Kazakh language, it also occurs in Jenisch (A German based argot) and here is an example from Wörterbuch der Gauner- und ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
1 vote

Examples of Umlaut in a living language

Maybe Standard High German counts in here: In High German, the plural of Fuß "foot" is Füße with double marking: both umlaut and the ending -e /ə/ occur. Note that the dialectal basis of the so-...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar

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