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7 votes
Accepted

Has a Dravido-Australic superfamily been proposed?

There is no evidence of a linguistic link between Dravidian languages and Australian languages and I haven't heard of a proposal for 'Dravido-Australic' superfamily. Typologically the groups of ...
Gaston Ümlaut's user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

What is (or was) the exative case?

With the reference given by Matthew Fulton, the Exative is the case denoting the the direction from, i.e., in more standard terminology, the Ablative. The word exative was an ad-hoc invention of ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
5 votes

Which (australian aboriginal?) language classifies nouns in "upright" things and "lying" things?

The language you're thinking of could be Enga. It's got all these existential verbs, depending on the referent! kata- occurs with subject NPs whose typical referents are judged to be tall, large, ...
Omar and Lorraine's user avatar
3 votes

Australia - absence of sibilants

The problems with attributing this fact to otitis media are (a) that given this study, the causes of the condition may be modern environmental and not genetic and (b) it also afflicts populations that ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.2k
3 votes
Accepted

Australia - absence of sibilants

I remember reading about a hypothesis that Australian languages may have been influenced by high-frequency hearing loss caused by otitis media. High frequencies are supposed to be more important for ...
brass tacks's user avatar
  • 18.3k
3 votes

What's the reconstruction of the word for fire in proto-Australian?

Unfortunately, there's no real consensus on any sort of "Proto-Australian" reconstruction. Some linguists like Dixon proposed "Australian" as an actual language family, with a ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 67.3k
2 votes

Which (australian aboriginal?) language classifies nouns in "upright" things and "lying" things?

You could be thinking of the way many Australian languages use positional verbs for locative and existential predication, ie where English would use 'to be'. For example (from Pintupi, Pama-Nyungan) ...
Gaston Ümlaut's user avatar
2 votes

Which (australian aboriginal?) language classifies nouns in "upright" things and "lying" things?

The language you're thinking of could be Yuchi. It has a complex gender system, involving animacy, biological sex, and uprightedness of inanimate objects. (But it does not coalesce biological sex ...
Omar and Lorraine's user avatar
2 votes

Why is Indonesian Google Translator voice so much better than English?

IMO the English is better than the Indonesian, though both are 10 times better than the Afrikaans which is 100 times better than the Swahili (which is infinitely better than the Zulu). Icelandic is ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.2k
1 vote

Australia - absence of sibilants

I think that a phenomenon known in biology as founder effect is responsible here: When the proto-language lacks fricatives, its descendants probably continue with this particular feature. In addition, ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar

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