8 votes

Is the difference between a labialized consonant [ʷ] and a consonant followed by a [w] audible?

If you are looking for a phonetic basis for thinking that you have [gw] versus [gʷ], you can listen for an effect on the preceding segment, where the end of the previous vowel is more likely to show ...
  • 70.3k
6 votes
Accepted

Is the difference between a labialized consonant [ʷ] and a consonant followed by a [w] audible?

There are many key differences between [ʷ] and [w]. The most important is that [ʷ] is a secondary articulation on another sound, meaning it is a simultaneous modification, not a separate following ...
  • 2,334
6 votes
Accepted

Any Spanish speech variety where F is pronounced as ϕ?

/f/ as [ϕ] in Andean, Palenquero, Caribbean, Puerto Rican Spanish The Linguistics of Spanish - Andean Spanish - 2. Pronunciation 2.4 Pronunciation of /f/ /f/ is commonly articulated as a ...
  • 3,024
5 votes
Accepted

Is there a vowel equivalent to the bilabial approximant?

First off, a quick note about the use of / / vs. the use of [ ]. Usually the former is used for phonemes and the latter for phones. Since you are really talking about phones here, I'm going to shift ...
3 votes

Is the consonant [b] always voiced across languages? What about [p]?

I would add that, phonetically, voice is a matter of timing, more precisely of the VOT or Voice-Onset Time, which refers to the time when your vocal folds begin to vibrate with respect to the moment ...
1 vote

Why are bilabial lateral sounds deemed impossible?

The Handbook of the International Phonetic Association says (p. 9): Shaded cells occur where the intersection of a manner and a place of articulation define a sound which is thought not to be ...
  • 4,752
1 vote

How to transcribe a labial+glottal stop released as a bilabial nasal

It's a glottalized p, usually written [p']. But sometimes this term refers to ejective glottalization, with both closure and raising of the glottis, and of course in English we don't get raising of ...
  • 12.2k
1 vote

How to transcribe a labial+glottal stop released as a bilabial nasal

You are presumably hearing it right. "Something" is different from "rotten" in more than place of articulation: "rotten" = [rɑʔn̩]. "Something", in that pronunciation, is [sʌmʔm̩] (traditionally that ...
  • 70.3k
1 vote

How to transcribe a labial+glottal stop released as a bilabial nasal

After thinking about what you described, I was thinking and I think I realised you were probably referring to the colloquial shortening of the word that is indeed glottalised. I believe this sequence ...
  • 1,387

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