3 votes

Does this sentence violate Principle A of Binding Theory?

I'd personally say "no," for a few reasons. The first, if you take the idea that it is a different binding domain, and try to see if it could fit with principal B, then "John(i) wanted to buy him(i) a ...
matan-matika's user avatar
  • 2,364
3 votes

About Binding Theory and R-expression

There are a sources of confusion when it comes to such examples and the binding theory. At the point in time when Principle C and the traditional binding theory were established in the late 1970s and ...
Tim Osborne's user avatar
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3 votes
Accepted

Is the sentence "His only sibing is John's brother " violating Principle C of Binding Theory?

Well, either that or, more likely, an account that makes "John" bound is mistaken. It is pretty obvious that "John" in the example is not a bound variable. There is parallelism here between "command"...
Greg Lee's user avatar
  • 12.5k
2 votes

A quick question on binding theory

Government and Binding isn't my specialty, but I believe the basic answer is, these aren't pronominals. They refer back to a noun, certainly, but they don't act like nominals in the syntax (NPs or DPs ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 66.2k
2 votes
Accepted

Is binding semantic?

In traditional binding theory, the syntactic conditions A, B, and C restrict the domain of entities from which the antecedent can be picked. However, except for condition A, these conditions will ...
Keelan's user avatar
  • 4,214
2 votes

How does "own" affect binding?

I think this is more to do with assumptions stemming from real-world knowledge than with syntactic binding rules. "Being one's own boss" is a relatively unusual or paradoxical situation, or ...
TKR's user avatar
  • 10.9k
2 votes
Accepted

A question about Binding Theory

Binding Theory deals with which pronouns can go where, but not which form of a pronoun you use. Case Assignment is what determines "she" vs. "her", and the position of the pronoun in "He says she/*her ...
matan-matika's user avatar
  • 2,364
1 vote

What part of a non-restrictive relative clause corefers?

I agree that your example is a reduced non-restrictive relative clause. For evidence that appositives of this sort are reduced clauses, see McCawley's discussion of appositives. However, in the ...
Greg Lee's user avatar
  • 12.5k
1 vote
Accepted

Is case of PRO always the same as its controller?

My dissertation of the loss of infinitival complementation in Greek deals with this issue; in Greek syntax there is a process called case attraction. Case attraction also occurs in Icelandic, Hindi, ...
Carole Chaski's user avatar

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