3

Well, either that or, more likely, an account that makes "John" bound is mistaken. It is pretty obvious that "John" in the example is not a bound variable. There is parallelism here between "command" and "C-command". Backwards pronominalization within the same sentence is okay when antecedent does not command the pro-form and neither does the pro-form ...


3

I'd personally say "no," for a few reasons. The first, if you take the idea that it is a different binding domain, and try to see if it could fit with principal B, then "John(i) wanted to buy him(i) a new pair of shoes" would be possible, but it isn't. The "want" in here is a "control verb" - a verb that has the same actor for both the matrix and ...


2

Binding Theory deals with which pronouns can go where, but not which form of a pronoun you use. Case Assignment is what determines "she" vs. "her", and the position of the pronoun in "He says she/*her is great", the "she" form (subject/nominative case) can go there, but the "her" form (object/oblique) cannot.


1

I agree that your example is a reduced non-restrictive relative clause. For evidence that appositives of this sort are reduced clauses, see McCawley's discussion of appositives. However, in the clause "(who is) one of the newest members", the expression "one of the newest members" is not in a coreferential position. It predicates something of "who". The ...


1

My dissertation of the loss of infinitival complementation in Greek deals with this issue; in Greek syntax there is a process called case attraction. Case attraction also occurs in Icelandic, Hindi, Korean... so I mention these in the discussion. I examined Government-Binding (obviously for PRO) as well as Lexical-Functional Grammar and Generalized Phrase ...


1

A purely syntactic answer starts by pointing out that Principle C of binding theory, as the other ones, should not be confused with a law of nature. It is more properly a rather vague description of a general tendency of human languages and it is in the course of trying to formulate it more precisely that we expect to find interesting phenomenons, examples ...


1

The binding theory as presented in Haegeman's book has long since been abandoned by most people who study binding phenomena in a serious way. That book presents the traditional binding theory according to Chomsky (1981, 1986). While it may be good to study and learn that stuff to gain the big picture of the development of syntactic theory, be aware that the ...


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