5

Remacadamized (Latin/French, Gaelic, Hebrew, Greek, English) isn't in the OED, but Macadamized is.


3

Old Turkish (from 8th century on) has kadaş and ka kadaş in the meaning “kinsman”. Anatolian Turkish kardeş results from a folk-etymological reinterpretation of the old word, as if from karın "womb" + daş "sharer". Clauson in his "Etymological Dictionary of pre-13th-century Turkish" argues that ka is a loan from Middle Chinese, ...


2

I'm one of the two people who suggested that term. I'm completely fine with having the plural be "animae". The only reason I didn't like it is that I'm not familiar with any other "-ae" plural occuring in English, and at least when pronounced in the way one would (I think) use in German, it just sounds awful to me. So the main reason I &...


2

It's not uncommon cross-linguistically for borrowed words to be "indeclinable"—that is, they don't inflect in any way, even if they should according to the rules of the destination language. For example, in French, the plural of caribou is caribous. But when it was borrowed into English it became indeclinable: one caribou, many caribou. This is ...


1

As others have mentioned, perhaps this is not something that academic linguists care too much about. But it is certainly true that some languages borrow more than others, and it can be quite fun for language learners to identify the "borrowing patterns" in various languages. Here is a rough listing of "heavy", "moderate", and ...


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