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9 votes

What is the name for the phenomenon or process by which the brain knows what "it" in a sentence refers to?

Within some branches of linguistics, it may be referred to as any of the following: reference resolution pronoun resolution pronoun reference resolution anaphora resolution Notice that reference ...
Araucaria - him's user avatar
7 votes

Are false cognates something languages tend to create?

It depends what you mean by "tend to create". For one, there are certain words that do tend to be the same across unrelated languages—for external reasons. English boom and Ancient Greek ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 67.3k
7 votes

Do multilinguals have one language they predominantly think in?

I have a single native language (Russian) and have learned English. I can say that I occasionally think either in Russian or English even though I have never lived in English-speakling environment. ...
Anixx's user avatar
  • 6,663
7 votes

Word meaning as function of the composition of its phonemes

This is probably not the kind of answer you are looking for, but I guess the following two points would have to be considered as strong indications that meaning is not computed from phonology. ...
David Vogt's user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

ODD NUMBER in Cognitive Linguistics of WILLIAM CROFT and D. ALAN CRUSE

"people will grade ODD NUMBERS for centrality, even though the category ODD NUMBER has a clear definition in terms of necessary and sufficient features" means that you can ask people things like "...
brass tacks's user avatar
  • 18.3k
6 votes
Accepted

Are there logographic writing systems for the blind? Do blind users of logographic writing systems struggle like how deaf users of alphabets do?

In short, no. The various tactile writing systems developed for blind readers have all been alphabetic in nature. Some, such as Braille and its historical competitor New York Point, use arbitrary ...
Uri Granta's user avatar
  • 1,162
5 votes

Word meaning as function of the composition of its phonemes

Interestingly, it is so self-evident that the arbitrariness claim is true that nobody has experimentally verified the claim. But it would not be hard to do, if you have access to a captive subject ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.2k
5 votes
Accepted

Experimental support for construction grammar?

First, one big thing you're going to run into, almost no matter who you read: Most people in CxG focus their arguments against Chomskyan transformational grammar and other major competing approaches,1 ...
abarnert's user avatar
  • 2,625
5 votes

Do multilinguals have one language they predominantly think in?

Me, I am bilingual with English and Norwegian, and I master/have mastered some other languages as well. I'll have some thoughts in English, some in Norwegian or something else, and sometimes in a ...
Omar and Lorraine's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Are words in form of verbs and adjectives abstract concepts

Abstract vs concrete or figurative vs literal is a function of a word and its context, not of a dictionary entry lemma, a surface form or string literal like tree or dog. For example, if we point to ...
Adam Bittlingmayer's user avatar
4 votes

Why is research on grammatical gender important?

There are a few million answers (32, if I'm not mistaken), here is one. Bantu languages have a complex system of grammatical gender where nouns have some gender, and things that agree with nouns agree ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.2k
3 votes

Are the words "blue" and "red" universally linked to coldness and warmness in different languages?

Terms and perceptions involving color vary wildly across cultures and indeed time. For your interest I'd check out the World Color Survey (2009) by Paul Kay, Brent Berline, Luisa Maffi, ...
Micah's user avatar
  • 31
3 votes

What is the 'best' language, and by what metrics, why those metrics...?

Seeing you nor anyone else knows what you consider to be good in a language, or what a language should be good for as opposed to be could be good for, nobody can tell you what is the best language. I ...
Araucaria - him's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Subject-verb number agreement with complex subject

For one thing, some languages apparently do not have a way to coordinate two noun phrases on an equal level (or at least, no documented way). See this question: What is the difference between AND and ...
brass tacks's user avatar
  • 18.3k
3 votes

What is the difference between neurolinguistics and similar fields of study?

Alex has explained well each concept, but to be easier to understand, when we talk about neurolinguistics in contrast to pyscholinguistics, we are talking about studying language processing in the ...
Ana Carolina Gomes's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

What's a cogniteme?

The word cogniteme is formed similarly to such words as grapheme, morpheme etc. Some googling gave no results for the English spelling, but a few for the corresponging Russian когнитема. Here is the ...
Alex Mayants's user avatar
3 votes

The philosophical characteristics of functionalism and structuralism

I presume your question is about the above clustering, and you are not asking for a critical analysis of Givon's article. The implication of that clustering is that linguistic practice tends to fall ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.2k
2 votes

Does Gestalt theory tell us anything about syntax?

Langacker uses gestalt principles to argue for many structures of conceptualization(and thereby language). I think he would argue that the mental ability(and usual tendency) of reification (...
Bernizium's user avatar
2 votes

Do multilinguals have one language they predominantly think in?

These answers deal with the parts of our thoughts that take place in language, and yes, that is largely context dependent, as others have outlined. That is to say, if you're thinking about best way ...
Some_Guy's user avatar
  • 266
2 votes

Do multilinguals have one language they predominantly think in?

Many people I know who are otherwise perfectly multilingual have strong preferences for memorizing e.g. phone numbers in one of their languages, and find it much more difficult to do so in their other ...
microtherion's user avatar
2 votes

What will form a minimum yet complete set of verbs that can define any action?

Only one: do. to run = do running/do run (run as a noun) etc.
Anixx's user avatar
  • 6,663
2 votes

Relationship of senses across parts of speech

These words are related by derivation. In each case, one of the parts of speech was first. Then others were created from one or more of its senses, but can then take on a semantic life of their own. ...
Adam Bittlingmayer's user avatar
2 votes

Word meaning as function of the composition of its phonemes

I believe you are conflating arbitrariness with other concepts in your question. Phonetic arbitrariness means that in a language, semantics are independent of the choice of phonetics. First, let's ...
Mark Beadles's user avatar
  • 6,870
2 votes

What is the 'best' language, and by what metrics, why those metrics...?

I don't see any relationship between the various measures and the notion of some language being "best", a notion that is similar to the question "what is the best car?". However, you might be able to ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.2k
2 votes

What is the 'best' language, and by what metrics, why those metrics...?

To extend Araucaria's analogy, this is a bit like going to Physics.SE and asking "what is the best unit?". Well, it depends on your use case. If you want to measure time, then the best unit might be ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 67.3k
2 votes

Any good book recommendations on the relationship between language and thought?

Language and thought have a very happy marriage and as such the relationship shows up just about everywhere in linguistics. Any good modern (or even somewhat old) linguistics textbook should have a ...
tsainez's user avatar
  • 314
2 votes
Accepted

Origin of describing emotions with adjectives associated with taste

It may be related to Cognitive Metaphors we use. Our brain tries to simplify abstract concepts, and tries to find some similarities with physical experiences. For example, when the amount of money a ...
Muzaffar's user avatar
  • 136
2 votes

Can language reveal how we think?

This is implicit in the term "concept". Concepts are "things" viewed as a unit of sorts, and assigned a label (word, or more properly morpheme). There are diverse objects that we ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.2k
1 vote

Does the universal use of noun and verb phrases reflect how humans cognitively see the world as objects and relationships?

Your cognitive focus fits well with Langacker who defines these basic grammatical categories semantically, invoking cognitive abilities such as "conceptual grouping, tracking relations through ...
Robin's user avatar
  • 187

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