6

Using the Corpus Query Processor or a similar corpus engine with a suitable corpus to answer your question, the query [word="[Ii]ron.*"][word=".*"] and a frequency breakdown on the types does the job. The more difficult thing is finding a "suitable" corpus, news, science, or literary texts will give different ranking lists.


4

I recommend that you look into Lexical Functions1. They are used in specialized dictionaries called Explanatory Combinatorial Dictionaries2 and describe semantic relationships between lexical units. Specifically, what you want is the Si function: S1(to teach) = teacher S2(to kill) = victim Where S1 returns the agent noun and S2 the patient noun. I don'...


3

Using a BYU corpus, you can search for iron* _nn* where the first part matches words starting with “iron” and the second part matches nouns. It’s as simple as typing that into the search box, though there are more complicated options available. The two BYU corpora I use the most are the Corpus of Contemporary American English and the British National ...


3

A great place to start is http://www.collocates.info which is based on COCA (Corpus of Contemporary American English). It is incredibly comprehensive (not free but the prices range from $45-$250). This site also answers the question as to how many collocates there are in English? 4.3 million. That is from the perspective of all possible collocate ...


2

First, subject or object do not enter into this in any way. It looks like you're looking for nouns corresponding semantically to verbs. Once you have the nouns, they can be subject or object. There is no such one to one mapping. Verbs that describe actions or states can have corresponding nouns that describe those actions or states as concepts. However, ...


2

Wikipedia defines the source and target domains as: Source domain: the conceptual domain from which we draw metaphorical expressions (e.g., love is a journey). Target domain: the conceptual domain that we try to understand (e.g., love is a journey). So in this case it's the other way around than you have described, with 'water / rain' being the source ...


1

The natural phenomena are the source, and the attack/action is the target, in this case. There are numerous examples in English of acts of physical aggression being compared to weather phenomena, specifically precipitation, so the conceptual metaphor could be WAR IS WEATHER or more specific, like VIOLENCE IS PRECIPITATION. Here are some other examples from ...


1

These are called "verb frames" or "subcategorisation frames". In English, one frame has many verbs in it, and one verb may belong to many frames.


1

There is an answer to your question find the pair of words that never appear together, and have the highest individual frequency (the sum of them): Using the Penn Treebank as a text corpus, the top 10 pairs are: (8090, 'the', 'the'), (6364, 'the', 'of'), (6209, 'the', 'to'), (5923, 'the', 'a'), (5923, 'a', 'the'), (5617, 'the', 'in'), (5556, 'the', '...


1

Here is one that looks well-researched (starting on p. 214 with the appendix): The high frequency collocations of spoken and written English This one is only for spoken English: Beyond single words - The most frequent collocations in spoken English


1

Wordnet might be helpful. Not Wordnet proper but one of the "standoff files", the Morphosemantic Links database. From the Wordnet home page: The majority of the WordNet’s relations connect words from the same part of speech (POS). Thus, WordNet really consists of four sub-nets, one each for nouns, verbs, adjectives and adverbs, with few cross-POS ...


1

You can download Google Ngrams whole dataset. http://storage.googleapis.com/books/ngrams/books/datasetsv2.html


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