12

Applying the comparative method to contemporary dialects (not MSA) would not result in Classical Arabic, since the contemporary dialects have lost features found in Classical Arabic, such as case. However, parallel to proto-Romance, a proto-language antecedent to the modern dialects could in principle be reconstructed. Ferguson (1959) "The Arabic koine&...


7

One page further (p. 587), Huehnergard gives as one of the changes from Proto-Semitic to Old Babylonian: Common Semitic *ḫ and *x̣ merged to ḫ (Huehnergard 2003):      *ḫamisum > ḫamšum ‘five’; *saḫānum > šaḫānum ‘to be warm’;      *x̣apārum > ḫepērum ‘to dig’; *rax̣āṣ́um > raḫāṣ́um ‘to wash’. The reference is to the author's 'Akkadian ḫ and ...


5

Quite a few, and they mostly inherited it from Proto-Romance. In Classical Latin (the Latin written by Vergil and Cicero), there were a few different ways of forming adverbs, using the suffixes -e and -iter. For example, "sad" was tristis, and "sadly" was triste. In Vulgar Latin (the Latin spoken on the streets of Rome), however, these ...


5

It is well known that Slovak and Belarusian are members of the Slavic language family, so there is obviously some degree of relatedness. Whether or not that particular website has a reasonable metric of linguistic relatedness is a matter that we could discuss at length (but we won't). Typically, such computations are based on lexical similarity, and I will ...


4

I think you are asking why this word is spelt with -ous rather than with -us. In English, -ous is the usual offshoot of Latin -us in words borrowed via Old French; the development is -us > -eux > -ous. Later, this spelling is adopted also for words taken directly from Latin or Greek. We have glorious, copious, generous and lots more.


3

I'll come back to this in 25 years to see if I have a different view, but as far as I can tell there are no properties of particular language phoneme selection that make a language senior-friendly vs. senior-unfriendly. There are some "whole language" properties that are challenging, viz. languages where by convention you talk fast, or quietly, but ...


3

There is very nice language similarity chart, almost one hundred languages compared..


1

Word frequency is already subjective within one language; across languages it's completely arbitrary The most frequent words are function words. But a function word in one language may be expressed by morphology or syntax in another, or by another part of speech. So your results will be decided by what you count as a word, and which languages you include, ...


1

There is research by Jürgen Meisel on this topic, specially in the context of language acquisition by children. The main takeaway is that the kind of errors made by native language learners are different from the kind of errors made by second language learners. Also note, that linguistically, spoken language is the gold standard. Mastering a written language ...


1

la raison que means something else => la raison qu'il propose = the reason he proposes.


1

In Arabic, Plural in Arabic is divided into sparse very few few more than sparse plenty a lot combined too much for Example, the word Man = RaJol , with the root R-J-L Plural sparse ➡ Rjajel equal to the English phrase 'few men' Plural few ➡ ِArajel equal to saying 'some few men' in English Plural plenty ➡ Rejal ...


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