13

First of all, the sentence I have my hair cut. is an example of a Construction. That is, there is a special model for this clause, with its own unique sets of meanings, uses, restrictions and affordances. So one shouldn't expect it to be a normal short sentence. And it isn't. In a sentence with only 5 words, there are 2 verbs and two noun phrases, so the ...


5

I have my hair [cut]. This is a catenative construction, where causative "have" is a catenative verb with the past-participial clause "cut" functioning as its catenative complement. The intervening NP "my hair" is the (raised) syntactic object of "have" and the understood (semantic) subject of the subordinate clause.


4

Just as you can view the question of the self-descriptiveness of "non-self-descriptive" as a form of the liar's paradox ("this statement is false") you can similarly view the question of whether "autological" is autological along the lines of "this statement is true." The traditional analysis is that such statements can be taken as either true or false, ...


4

Basically, the definitions usually used in the syntax and semantics literatures are: If a linguistic form expresses evidential meaning, you are talking about the source that you got the information from, regardless of how sure you are about it If a linguistic form expresses epistemic meaning, you are talking about how sure you are about the information, ...


3

The simple answer to the question is as follows: Yes, the complement of an auxiliary verb in a traditional X-bar-theoretic approach does view the entire string following the inverted auxiliary as the complement of the auxiliary. That this is so can be seen by examining an example. The next tree is taken from Haegeman (1991: 109). Haegeman’s book was written ...


3

They are not constituents, but just parts of ones that are best called fragments. In full, as in for example "It is highly unlikely that Ed will turn up", they are extraposition constructions, in which the dummy pronoun "it" is subject and the content ("that") clause is in extraposed position, outside the VP. That Ed will turn up is highly unlikely. [...


3

Traditionally, linguists do not consider these forms to be a single constituent in English. Rather, it is thought that the entire that-clause is a subordinate clause embedded in another clause, called the matrix clause, as an argument of the matrix clause. For instance, if we have the sentence It is not the case that the sun rises from the west, then that ...


1

I don't find your constituency tests convincing, so I would go with the complement analysis unless there are other arguments against it. You can insert a pause at "the paw — of the kitten" but not "the — paw of the kitten" I'm not familiar with this constituency test, but doesn't it definitely have exceptions? There are many morphemes ...


1

The ungrammaticality is not related to the fact that V cannot take IP as complement. This fact is evidenced by (1) and (2) (hence your first question): (1) She wants [IP to leave] (2) She wants [IP him to leave] The ungrammaticality is related to the strong wh-feature [+wh] which is left unchecked. The object which book of read, after assigned a theta-...


1

There is some syntactic evidence first noticed by Jerry Morgan that certain apparent topmost clauses are more like qualifying adverbs. That involves the agreement of tag-question subjects with main sentence subjects. Even if there is a complement clause with an available subject, ordinarily a tag-question subject will not agree with it. So, for example, ...


1

Actually, "alcohol" is an argument of the verb "ban" (not the noun "ban"). Note the interpretation of "sudden" as adverbial in "a sudden alcohol ban". The NP is a nominalization of a sentence whose main verb is "ban".


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