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13 votes

I have my hair cut - "my hair" a Direct Object?

First of all, the sentence I have my hair cut. is an example of a Construction. That is, there is a special model for this clause, with its own unique sets of meanings, uses, restrictions, and ...
jlawler's user avatar
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5 votes

I have my hair cut - "my hair" a Direct Object?

I have my hair [cut]. This is a catenative construction, where causative "have" is a catenative verb with the past-participial clause "cut" functioning as its catenative ...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 867
4 votes

What is the name for the phenomenon where an English verb that takes a clausal complement either does or does not mark the infinitive with "to"?

It's called subcategorization: particular words (not just verbs) allow or require particular words or structures for their arguments. There may be some heuristics for determining the allowable ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
  • 7,464
4 votes
Accepted

The Grelling-Nelson Paradox

Just as you can view the question of the self-descriptiveness of "non-self-descriptive" as a form of the liar's paradox ("this statement is false") you can similarly view the question of whether "...
Bill Clark's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

What is the difference between evidential, epistemic, and evaluative fragments?

Basically, the definitions usually used in the syntax and semantics literatures are: If a linguistic form expresses evidential meaning, you are talking about the source that you got the information ...
WavesWashSands's user avatar
3 votes

What is the name of introductory expressions like "It is not the case that..."

They are not constituents, but just parts of ones that are best called fragments. In full, as in for example "It is highly unlikely that Ed will turn up", they are extraposition constructions, in ...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 867
3 votes
Accepted

What is the name of introductory expressions like "It is not the case that..."

Traditionally, linguists do not consider these forms to be a single constituent in English. Rather, it is thought that the entire that-clause is a subordinate clause embedded in another clause, called ...
WavesWashSands's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

In X bar theory, is the first auxiliary the head of an interrogative clause and the remainder the complement?

The simple answer to the question is as follows: Yes, the complement of an auxiliary verb in a traditional X-bar-theoretic approach does view the entire string following the inverted auxiliary as the ...
Tim Osborne's user avatar
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2 votes

Can a complementizer (C) take two complements (COMPS)?

Later generative grammar usually insists on binary branching, so, as Keelan already said in a comment, you get C:for + IP:[them to go to the UK]. Then, you need a rule of exceptional case marking, in ...
Alazon's user avatar
  • 875
2 votes
Accepted

Is it possible to have a determiner without a complement?

I thought about my question and the arguments presented by others. Most arguments look at the question from the Chomskian point of view, while we can look at the word's properties. Let's look at the ...
Asdoost's user avatar
  • 193
2 votes

Is it possible to have a determiner without a complement?

It depends on your analysis, but many syntacticians take personal pronouns like "he" to be of category D without any c-selectional features (particularly if they like their noun phrases ...
Draconis's user avatar
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1 vote

Is "of the kitten" in "the paw of the kitten" a complement to the NP or an adjunct to the DP?

I don't find your constituency tests convincing, so I would go with the complement analysis unless there are other arguments against it. You can insert a pause at "the paw — of the kitten" ...
brass tacks's user avatar
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1 vote
Accepted

How is the ungrammaticality of the following sentence explained?

The ungrammaticality is not related to the fact that V cannot take IP as complement. This fact is evidenced by (1) and (2) (hence your first question): (1) She wants [IP to leave] (2) She wants [IP ...
Tsutsu's user avatar
  • 1,068
1 vote

What is the name of introductory expressions like "It is not the case that..."

There is some syntactic evidence first noticed by Jerry Morgan that certain apparent topmost clauses are more like qualifying adverbs. That involves the agreement of tag-question subjects with main ...
Greg Lee's user avatar
  • 12.5k
1 vote

Semantic arguments of nouns

Actually, "alcohol" is an argument of the verb "ban" (not the noun "ban"). Note the interpretation of "sudden" as adverbial in "a sudden alcohol ban". The NP is a nominalization of a sentence whose ...
Greg Lee's user avatar
  • 12.5k

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