9 votes
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Is it possible for a language to have both left-headed and right-headed compounds?

Starting with your last request that the answer be based on morphology, this is, in fact, one of the problems of compounding, because it's not entirely a morphological phenomenon. Compound ...
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  • 1,404
9 votes

πίστις & ἐλπίζω related linguistically?

These words are not considered to be related. πίστις ‘faith, trust’ and the verb πείθομαι ‘to trust, obey, be persuaded’ come from Indo-European *bhidh-, related to Latin fides, with *bh- > *ph- > p ...
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5 votes
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What is the difference between compound words and derivational words?

A lot depends on your theory of morphology - see e.g. Lieber and Štekauer 2011 - see esp. 1.1.4 Summary. Several tests for compounding have been proposed; the biggest problem is that they do not ...
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  • 8,434
5 votes
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Is there an objective definition of compound words?

I agree that the English spelling of compounds is to a large degree arbitrary, but I also think there is an objectifiable distinction between compounds and phrases, at least in Indo-European languages....
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4 votes
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Name of rule for whether compounds should be written with a space or not

This is an orthography rule, not a grammar rule. Orthography isn't really a concern for linguistics. I have a feeling that this is rather arbitrary for English. In German (or a other fusional or ...
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  • 6,120
4 votes
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Is there a language without compound nouns?

Compounding is very rare in Semitic, which appears to contradict the claim. The following is from Orin D. Gensler, 'Morphological Typology of Semitic', in Stefan Weninger (ed.), The Semitic Languages:...
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  • 3,078
3 votes

Are bound forms in compounds more resistant to sound changes?

I don't think that bound forms tend to resist sound changes in general. Bound forms might in some cases provide more information about the historical form of a word because they occur in a different ...
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3 votes
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Replacement of the letters in Japanese while compounding words

This phenomenon is called rendaku, or "sequential voicing". Many phonemes in Japanese occur in voiced/unvoiced pairs. In kana writing, these are distinguished with a dakuten "voice mark" over the ...
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  • 52k
3 votes

Compounds: Comparing Hyphenated With Other Forms?

First, you have to be careful to not confuse compounds themselves with the orthography for compounds. What you're asking about is the orthographic variation in how compounds are represented. As far ...
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3 votes

Rules to constructing a proper compound noun in Ancient Greek

See Why "agoraphobia" not "agorophobia"? myia is a first declension noun, so originally in Greek the correct answer was myiaphagia, just as agoraphobia is actually the correct ...
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3 votes
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Rules to constructing a proper compound noun in Ancient Greek

The rules for the formation of compounds are explained in the more elaborate Greek grammars, but I think you are asking about this specific word. In Classical Greek there are quite a large number of ...
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2 votes

Should compounded words through agglutination be treated as unigrams or n-grams?

For parsing: if the word is already in your 'dictionary' then treat it as a 'unigram'; but if it is new to you then treat it as an 'ngram'. If you are doing semantic statistics on a corpus then you ...
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  • 646
2 votes

Should compounded words through agglutination be treated as unigrams or n-grams?

(Disclaimer: I don't have much background in linguistics) I think - if you are relating to agglutinantive and not polysynthetic languges - it would depend on what you are trying to build and the ...
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  • 1,225
1 vote

How to extract specific data from a TextGrid file?

I don't know how homogenous is TextGrid across different tools that use it, but there is a Python package, pympi which can be used to read Praat TextGrid files. In particular, pympi.Praat.TextGrid ...
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1 vote

How to extract specific data from a TextGrid file?

Xmin and xmax are the starting times in seconds, within the file (which goes from 0 to 4.360703 seconds), and ORT-MAU tells you the same thing (in this instance), but then tells you the time periods ...
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1 vote

Combine flexibility + ism , how ? thanks

In The Transition to Flexibility by Daniel C. Knudsen, Knudsen calls it flexibilism. Knudsen states the following: "The terms "flexibilism" and "flexible accumulation" refer to flexible ...
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1 vote
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Compounds: Comparing Hyphenated With Other Forms?

The only question I can answer is what conditions incline compounds to vary in this regard. It reflects the morphological type of the language, namely, isolating. Since affixes serve (despite many ...
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1 vote

Term for nouns strung together by conjunctions

The example Men, women and children are people could have a compound noun men, women, and children, but it would be unwise to refer to it that way, using the term "compound noun", because of confusion ...
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1 vote

Term for nouns strung together by conjunctions

Men, women and children is not a word, but a phrase (a noun phrase = NP 1 ), so you can not apply morphological terminology like compounding here. I don't think there's a special name for NP formation ...
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1 vote

Having trouble with assigning stress degrees to a long compound

At first sight, an analysis as a (binary composed) compound seems to be possible: You could start arguing about the precise labels; for reason of simplicity I just assumed that the suffix "-ed" makes ...
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  • 6,120
1 vote

πίστις & ἐλπίζω related linguistically?

I would edit the question but it wouldn't make much sense after. So, let me explain that faith is πίστις but hope is not ἐλπίζω but ελπίς. Ελπίζω is the verb not the noun. The etymology of those two ...
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  • 331
1 vote
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The complement of postmodifying prepositional phrases compounded by "and"

As Ivan writes, the example in the question is indeed an example of so-called right node raising (RNR). I can provide some more background information about the phenomenon. First, note the term itself ...
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  • 5,290
1 vote

The complement of postmodifying prepositional phrases compounded by "and"

Is your question about an analysis or about automated parsing? The phenomenon is dubbed right node raising. Search for it or read the wikipedia article that gives a nice overview and mentions the ...
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1 vote

English co-compounds? Is bittersweet a co-compound?

According to R. Huddleston & L. Bauer in The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language ,bitter-sweet is a coordinative compound, where the component bases are of equal status. In, for example, the ...
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