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20 votes

Why aren't conlangs very widely used?

Motivation is an essential factor determining language vitality. For example, the number of Hebrew speakers increased from zero to 9 million with a major spike in the past 100 years. Likewise, ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.1k
16 votes

Reconstructed PIE grammar? Could we be able to speak in Proto-European?

Just a set of words, or is there also a reconstructed grammar letting us speak in Common Proto-European? Absolutely! In fact, one of the best ways to show that a language is Indo-European is through ...
Draconis's user avatar
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11 votes

Why aren't conlangs very widely used?

Conlangs (usually artistic languages) are widely used for the sake of giving depth to a fictional world. Examples include Klingon from Star Trek, Na'vi from James Cameron's Avatar, Dothraki and High ...
dan04's user avatar
  • 322
11 votes

Why aren't conlangs very widely used?

Because there is little compelling reason to learn them. Consider the very specific example of Toki Pona. It’s a relatively simple language, and most people can learn it at a basic level in a matter ...
Austin Hemmelgarn's user avatar
10 votes

Why aren't conlangs very widely used?

Children will learn the language(s) used by the adults around them, and natural languages are far more widely used than conlangs. A very small number of people are fluent in a constructed language and ...
Draconis's user avatar
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9 votes
Accepted

Is there a rounded /æ/? Is there a Near-open front rounded vowel?

This is the official IPA chart. As you can see, the front round vowel in that region is the open front round vowel [ɶ], the round counterpart of [a], and [æ] has no round counterpart. Note that ...
user6726's user avatar
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5 votes
Accepted

Is there any natural language having minimal pairs over tongue root position?

Insofar as you've put creaky and breathy voice in one bin, and a three-way distinction in "ATR" in a second, you have described a situation that doesn't exist in any known language. There ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.1k
5 votes

Where to start with deciphering this language?

"How do you go about deciphering a language without any spoken basis, no native speakers to converse with, or another other leads to go on besides ones provided by context alone?" You don't. With ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
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5 votes
Accepted

Experiment of creating an artificial language by cycles of memorizing errors

This sounds like one of the series of papers by Kirby and/or Smith; e.g., Smith, Kirby, Brighton 2003. They just call it 'iterated learning'.
Jeremy Needle's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

What reasons could be given for Artificial Languages not to be considered part of linguistics study field?

The question is "What are the reasons Artificial Languages should not be under the scope of Linguistics" (it's not a question about writing systems). As a question about personal opinion it is not ...
user6726's user avatar
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4 votes

Ending a word in a stressed "h"

"Stress" is a property of syllables, not consonants, so you could drop the restriction "stressed". In fact, no words in English end in [h], leaving out spelling where it is an orthographic device to ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.1k
4 votes

What would you call a case specifying something is far away from a noun?

If this List of cases on Wikipedia is complete, then there is no name (yet) for a case which expresses location far away from something. Probably there is just no language that would express this by ...
Natalie Clarius's user avatar
4 votes

How should I form grammatical cases in my conlang?

Latin's case system is fairly standard for Indo-European languages. But it's by no means the only option even within that language family. At most, English has nominative, accusative, genitive, and ...
Draconis's user avatar
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4 votes
Accepted

By what means would the root "let" evolve to "ly" in a naturalistic conlang?

Since you're asking on Linguistics instead of Constructed Languages, here's a real-world example! Look at Ancient Greek (Attic/Koine dialect) τείν-ει /tiːn-iː/ "she spreads", next to Latin ten-et /...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 66.8k
3 votes

How should I form grammatical cases in my conlang?

In a conlang, you can essentially try out whatever you want. When you want to go for a naturalistic, but simple case system, there are are languages with just two cases termed nominative (for the ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
3 votes

Strange Vocal Trills (L, Th, and Q)

Regardless of the fact that you've described physical impossibilities, if you can do them, that suggests you mis-analyzed the sounds. There are very many strange sounds in human languages. The first ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.1k
3 votes

Reconstructed PIE grammar? Could we be able to speak in Proto-European?

If you wish to explore the adequacy of PIE vocabulary and grammar, as reconstructed, for purposes of narration, I would impishly suggest that you take a stab at composing a fable, retelling some of ...
Bert Barrois's user avatar
3 votes

Is having many iconic features more common in artificial languages?

Etymologically speaking, "artificial" essentially means "deliberately created", as contrasted with "natural" which is that which "just happens". Art is ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.1k
3 votes

What reasons could be given for Artificial Languages not to be considered part of linguistics study field?

Speculating about how people could better communicate doesn't seem relevant or useful to linguists, who seek to understand how people do actually communicate. Linguistics is a science, based on ...
Greg Lee's user avatar
  • 12.5k
3 votes

Are there languages which require aspiration for some stops?

The problem is that if all consonants are the same thing, what are they? Aspiration is generally understood to refer to voice onset time, with larger values being "aspirated". But there is no ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.1k
2 votes

Where to start with deciphering this language?

If it is a language (and it could be, lots of games have conlangs) step one is get lots more data, preferably some with known translations or at least known topics.
curiousdannii's user avatar
  • 6,209
2 votes

Creating Unicode Characters for new language

There are essentially two option you have: Skim through the existing Unicode characters and select a subset of them suitable for your conlang Go forth and create a conscript (constructed writing ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
2 votes

Does the Klingon spoken in Star Trek: Discovery present a harsh/ventricular/pressed voice phonation?

This is properly the domain of https://conlang.stackexchange.com , but at least one actor in Discovery (the one who played T'Kuvma) made a point of saying that he wanted his Klingon to sound African (...
Nick Nicholas's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

Transliteration of Cyrillic

The English sound 'i' as in 'ink' is closer to Ыы [ɨ], which is usually transliterated into the Latin alphabet as Yy. And don't forget, there's also a letter Її that you can use as you like, in ...
Yellow Sky's user avatar
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2 votes

For English, is there a finite set of patterns for constructing sentences?

Well, yes, it is finite. It would only rise to infinite if you have a sentence with infinitely many words. And Computational Linguistics is an entire field based around going off of viable patterns in ...
Zoey's user avatar
  • 187
2 votes
Accepted

For English, is there a finite set of patterns for constructing sentences?

In one interpretation of the concept "pattern", there are infinitely many patterns. Some example of "patterns": [det N aux V det N], [det adj N aux V det N], [det N aux V det adj N]...
user6726's user avatar
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1 vote

On the effects of sound changes on case suffixes

In real language, having affixes means that inevitably there will develop phonological rules which change the pronunciation of roots and affixes. The only way to avoid that is to not have affixes, and ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.1k
1 vote

What would /ɯ/ most likely be replaced by?

I'm afraid no-one has collected comprehensive data yet for sound shifts due to borrowing/naturalizing foreign sounds. As a substitute we have some diachronic data (link to the Searchable Index ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
1 vote

Is there a rounded /æ/? Is there a Near-open front rounded vowel?

I've seen a ligature of (ɔ + e) being used unofficially. maybe that
iwanttoeat's user avatar
1 vote

How should I form grammatical cases in my conlang?

One personal example: my mother tongue has no case structure and most people I know do not speak a language that has a real, rough case system like Latin. After I learned some languages that had cases ...
QuantumBrick's user avatar

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