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4 votes
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How do we parse the sentence, "I have never seen a fish get cooked like that"?

In this sentence, "get," just like "be" in other passive sentences, is the passivizer. That is, the active form of "I have never seen a fish get cooked like that" is (just like the active form of "I ...
matan-matika's user avatar
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4 votes
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Can "has been" be copular? Can the perfect tenses be copular?

Yes, if it is a copula in the simple present, it is also a copula in any conjugation available. Adding tense, aspect and mood to a copula does not change its functional role.
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
3 votes

Are there languages where the imperative of "to be" (as in "be happy") is non-existent or achievable through vastly different means?

Thai is somewhat similar to what jick described for Korean in that its adjectives are stative verbs but cannot be used as imperatives, so the phrase "be happy" would be achieved by one of any number ...
Edward Chien's user avatar
3 votes

How to Identify Copulas in the Wild

This may not be a satisfying answer (is this becoming a trend with my answers?), but here's the best advice I can give: A word is a copula if and only if calling it a copula makes your theory more ...
Draconis's user avatar
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2 votes

Syntax of Ik ben het beu

This is indeed an object with a copula but not a direct object (leidend voorwerp). If it were a direct object you should be able to turn it passive, which is not possible. This type of object is ...
Lu Kas's user avatar
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2 votes
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Syntax of Ik ben het beu

This construction is reminiscent of a Dutch "verb of innocence", such as Ik ben het vergeten (lit. I1 am2 it3 forgotten4, "I forgot (it)." ), where the grammatical subject is specifically marked as ...
Mark Beadles's user avatar
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2 votes

Are there languages where the imperative of "to be" (as in "be happy") is non-existent or achievable through vastly different means?

Korean is unusual in that its "adjectives" (or "stative verbs") behave like full-fledged verbs. (Imagine, instead of "He is happy" or "a happy person", you say ...
jick's user avatar
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2 votes
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Are copulas object/complement heads? P&P & LFG

In this case the outermost f-structure is the IP whose functional head is the predicative phrase. Copulae are (in LFG parlance) coheads, i.e., they have no PRED though they extend the predicator of ...
Atamiri's user avatar
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2 votes

Are "Inverse copular constructions" accurately described by Wikipedia?

The Wikipedia article is inconsistent and incorrect in part concerning the issue flagged in the question. The correct analysis of the “riot/revolt” sentences is as follows (but altered a bit to allow ...
Tim Osborne's user avatar
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1 vote
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Update: what is the structure of the copula sentence in phrase structure grammar

Because phrase structure grammars are about syntax - patterns by which words get put together, without concern for what the resulting sentence means - the copula is just reflected like other verbs: ...
Julius Hamilton's user avatar
1 vote

When an existential verb is used existentially as the predicate to a subject, is it true in all languages that it cannot take another predicate?

exist is simply not transitive, yes. Talking about is as if it were in any sense equivalent is not helpful, because the profered examples, where it is assumed to be, are deranged. "only" carries the ...
vectory's user avatar
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1 vote

How to Identify Copulas in the Wild

The most sensical cross-linguistic definition of "copula" is an element that is required for non-verbal predication. The elements in your examples could all qualify as copulas depending on what verbal ...
dkaufman's user avatar

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