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10 votes
Accepted

Using Polish-inspired z Digraphs for Czech, Slovak

No, it is not acceptable and it is never done. It used to be done before the changes that appeared gradually in the 15th century, inspired by a paper most likely written by Jan Hus around 1400. Before ...
Vladimir F Героям слава's user avatar
8 votes
Accepted

Historical explanations for soft/hard declensions in Czech

Balto-Slavic languages developed their own way to decline adjectives, by combining the nominal forms with the forms of personal pronouns (In Slavic *jъ, ja, je). Many Slavic languages (e.g., Russian) ...
Vladimir F Героям слава's user avatar
6 votes

Is the sound "ř" unique to Czech?

Another instance, though a sketchy one. At least one description of Tsakonian (I think it's Scutt, C. A. 1912-13. The Tsakonian Dialect I. The Annual of the British School at Athens 19. 133-173) ...
Nick Nicholas's user avatar
6 votes

Are phonemes worse recognizable in English than in Czech?

The number of phonemes in Czech and English is a simple matter of counting, and both languages have about 40 phonemes ("about" since phonemic status is a hypothesis dependent on method of analysis, ...
user6726's user avatar
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6 votes
Accepted

Why do I feel like "g" should mutate to "dz"?

I assume you're following the analogy of the /k~ts/ alternations in words like kluk, klucích. The sound /g/ is a voiced counterpart to the sound /k/, and likewise the sound /dz/ is a voiced ...
brass tacks's user avatar
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5 votes
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Influence of Polish and Czech on the phonology of German dialects

Areal features are often under-appreciated, especially the more subtle structural and semantic ones, as opposed to the more superficial lexical and phonological ones. And the contact between Slavic ...
Adam Bittlingmayer's user avatar
5 votes
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Relation between Russian "пока" and Czech "zatím"

First, about some things which are not very true in the question. The Russian за тем means “behind/after that ...” like in за тем домом “behind that house”. There is a Russian adverb затем “then, next”...
Yellow Sky's user avatar
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5 votes
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What does Potrefená mean in Czech?

Potrefená is a feminine gender past passive participle of the perfective verb potrefit “to hit”, its imperfective counterpart trefit has the same English translation, “to hit”. This verb is a ...
Yellow Sky's user avatar
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4 votes

Exceptions to Intrasyllabic Synharmony in modern Czech?

The so-called "Sound Law" and the thing that was regular is 1500 or more years old, when it was a general rule of articulation in the proto-language. It was a subconscious, unavoidable "...
user6726's user avatar
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4 votes

Why do I feel like "g" should mutate to "dz"?

Sound changes in different languages do not always fit into a regular pattern. Consider the effect of palatalisation on Latin /k/ and /g/ (written 'c' and 'g') In Italian, they are /tʃ/ and /dʒ/ - ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
  • 7,464
4 votes

Are phonemes worse recognizable in English than in Czech?

This is native-speaker bias at work, Czech phonemes aren't actually especially easy to distinguish in general if you don't speak Czech natively. Czech has an unusually rich array of palatal or ...
brass tacks's user avatar
  • 18.3k
3 votes

Czech: "Býval + minulý čas" VS. minulý čas

It is the past tense of the conditional mood (kondicionál minulý, podmiňovací způsob minulý). A short official and authoritative description in Czech can be found at http://prirucka.ujc.cas.cz/?id=575#...
Vladimir F Героям слава's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

What is the behind the declension "obrovskýma" in the phrase "obrovskýma očima" in Czech?

It is the dual instrumental case. Since usually everything has 2 eyes, the Czech noun oko “eye” has kept the old Slavic dual form oči, plural being oka. The Common Slavic language, like other Proto-...
Yellow Sky's user avatar
  • 18.5k
3 votes
Accepted

Havlík's law, 3, & 4 in Czech

The form "třmi" is actually documented as the Old Czech form of the number třmi = třemi Zdroj: Šimek, F., Slovníček staré češtiny. Praha: Orbis, 1947. https://vokabular.ujc.cas.cz/hledani....
Vladimir F Героям слава's user avatar
1 vote

Why do I feel like "g" should mutate to "dz"?

It is not true that the phoneme g is not original in Czech. Not even the grapheme g is not "original" in Czech. However, it was used for a different phoneme (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...
Honza Zidek's user avatar
1 vote

Why aren't there any Czech dictionaries that report the gender of nouns?

dict.com, probably one of the largest english-czech dictionary freely available online, reports gender of nouns.
czerny's user avatar
  • 111
1 vote

Is the sound "ř" unique to Czech?

it's not unique to Czech. We have it in European Portuguese. It's written RJ in words like 'gorjeta' or 'sarjeta'.
hugo's user avatar
  • 19

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