7

I can only speak for Germany, and IANAL (I am not a lawyer). The situation is basically as follows: You can collect material from accessible sources (from the web, from radio broadcasts, from TV) and do analyses on that material You can do so within a closed collaboration with some collaborators including students and guests visiting your institution (they ...


6

If you're interested in inflected forms, you could take data from Wiktionary's Latin section. Most verb entries have automatically-generated conjugation tables, and all of the content is CC-BY-SA. If you're interested in meanings, you can download data files for well-regarded dictionaries through the Perseus Project. Lewis and Short is my go-to resource; ...


4

A is the conventional name for a particular cuneiform glyph, typically its most common or best-known pronunciation. But the sign A can be read as a, aya₂, e₄, ea, ŋa₁₀, or many others. The JSON is mapping the name to a list of all these possible readings. Sometimes, though, a cuneiform glyph is made from other glyphs joined together. There are a variety of ...


2

It depends on your linguistic viewpoint. For typology, a good wealth of examples can be found in WALS online.


2

The CMU Dictionary is easily convertible if you are willing to do a tiny bit of programming. Each phoneme is surrounded by space and there's a pretty obvious mapping from e.g. "AE" is [æ], "AH" is [ə/ʌ], "AY" is [ai], the numbers indicate primary, secondary versus no stress. The advantage of this as a source is that (for English) there are very many ways to ...


2

Since you did not mention it in the question: The World Atlas of Linguistic Structures (WALS) contains some of the data you are looking for. Specifically, you can find information on the size of consonant and vowel inventories, consonant-vowel ratio, the presence or absence of some specific types of consonants, the presence or absence of front rounded ...


2

The arrangement of phonemes within syllables and words, which is what much of your question appears to be about, is known as 'phonotactics'. The World phonotactic database would therefore be likely to hold some of the answers you're seeking. This database holds phonotactic data for over 4000 languages, so it covers a good proportion (perhaps a majority) of ...


2

I'd suggest the COBUILD wordform corpus in CELEX, which is now freely available through WebCelex. The interface is horribly unintuitive, but you can use the "Create Lexicon > English Wordforms" option to create a database of inflected verb forms linked to their lemmas, plus inflection information and frequency.


2

The main corpus for Gothic is Wulfila's sixth-century translation of the Bible, which is attested across a number of different codices (the silver-lettered Codex Argenteus being the most famous one). All the surviving parts have been digitized and put online by the Wulfila project. That said, though, it'll be much easier to learn with a good grammar and/or ...


1

I am guessing this is a UK dialect, since I disagree with a number of the factual claims. There are major gaps in the data, which should mean you are free to predict either outcome in those contexts. Overall, your analysis looks "rightish". It is fairly well-known that there is a general vowel shortening triggered by voiceless coda stops, and that ...


1

For a recent project for my university on a similar topic we made use of the Oxford Learner's Dictionaries. Using a parser, you could easily look up a verb (or any word) by using the URL of the query function, e.g.: https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/search/english/?q=created The results display British English and American English transcriptions ...


1

Try George Lakoff and Mark Johnson's Metaphors we live by as a starter. This tiny book is widely available in libraries. It's going to give you an idea what to look for later. Additionally, there is a bibliography there as well.


1

Searching the Virtual Language Observatory maintained by the European CLARIN ERIC is the way to go. Enter conversation spoken in the search slit and narrow down the search using the facets (e.g., by chosing a language). Here is a bookmarked query on the VLO giving a lot of resources for English language.


1

Look to Typological Database System (TDS): https://languagelink.let.uu.nl/tds/main.html


1

For a quick and dirty approach to phylogenetics, you can look for Swadesh lists for many languages. For doing something better, I am afraid you will have to vet your data carefully, use the best etymological dictionaries available, and prepare it on your own.


1

One approach I know of is the comparison of Translationese (like in Translationese and its Dialects by Koppel and Ordan) and trying recognize the source language. The confusion matrix gives some clues about the "distance" between different languages. It works quite intuitively on the Europarl corpus of translations. But extensive amount of translations are ...


1

You can select the lines that you want to export, for example by clicking the little box on the top right next to the question mark in this screenshot: As the warning message says you can apparently only export 100 per day; is that too much of a restriction? Else I suppose you can come back every day to export the next pages.


1

Enter learners corpus into the search slit of the Virtual language observatory (VLO) and you will find a plethora of resources.


1

Assuming that you want data that would be suitable for problem sets, you could start with Gleason's Workbook in descriptive linguistics, and Ronald Langacker's textbook Fundamentals of linguistic analysis, still available at the original price. There is a textbook Laboratory manual for morphology and syntax in various editions, published by SIL and usually (...


1

Here is one from the LINDAT/CLARIN repository (for a specialised domain, but Open Data): ATCC: Pronunciation lexicon and n-gram counts for ASR module


1

Two other datasets for sequential short text classification: Switchboard Dialog Act Corpus. [Jurafsky et al.1997] MRDA: ICSI Meeting Recorder Dialog Act Corpus (Janin et al., 2003; Shriberg et al., 2004) In terms of size, here is an overview: In case anyone is interested, we presented an overview of the state-of-the art results on these three datasets in ...


1

I think http://www.collocates.info/ will have the data you need. Note, the full processed list is not free but is not outrageously expensive.


1

Some (all?) datasets from the Automatic Content Extraction (ACE) Program From Linguistic Data Consortium. "ACE (Automatic Content Extraction) English annotation guidelines for entities." (2005).: Unfortunately, it is not available free of charge.


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