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16 votes

Is the rarity of dental sounds explained by babies not immediately having teeth?

There is no evidence that dentals are rare per se – they exist in many languages, for example many Indic languages, Finnish, French and other Romance languages. What is rare is a contrast in front ...
user6726's user avatar
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11 votes
Accepted

The "th" sound as a plosive in British dialects

Th-stopping has always been a distinctive feature of Irish English, where the phonological distinction between [t] and [t̪], [d] and [d̪] is mostly maintained. It is not characteristic of most ...
Michaelyus's user avatar
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9 votes
Accepted

Did Persian ever have a hard or soft "th" sound?

There are two different issues here. First: New Persian never had a voiceless /ϑ/, at least not in words of Persian origin (though it is possible that in early Islamic times bi-lingual speakers did ...
fdb's user avatar
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7 votes
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Possible diachronic developments of th sounds

Proto-Semitic *ϑ becomes /ϑ/ in (classical) Arabic, /t/ in Aramaic and some Arabic dialects, /ʃ/ in Hebrew, /s/ in Amharic, /f/ in some Arabic dialects. Proto-Semitic *δ becomes /δ/ in (classical) ...
fdb's user avatar
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7 votes

West Germanic Th-Stopping

Th-stopping of original Proto-Germanic voiced /d~ð/ to /d/ in all contexts is normal for Old English. It seems to be a common feature of West Germanic languages. The modern-day /ð/ in "father" is due ...
brass tacks's user avatar
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5 votes
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Why is [ð] so rare?

Actually, [ð] is not so rare across languages. Apart from English, it exists in Icelandic, Swedish and Norwegian dialects, Danish, Kven, Saami, Welsh, Spanish, Catalan, Basque, various Italian ...
user6726's user avatar
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5 votes

What is DH- stopping?

"Th-stopping", in general, is when a dental fricative (/θ ð/, written as "th" in English) turns into a dental or alveolar stop (/t d/). This is currently happening in many dialects of English and has ...
Draconis's user avatar
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4 votes

Possible diachronic developments of th sounds

Using the searchable version of the Index Diachronica (courtesy of chridd), I found some other possible developments: Proto-Algonquian to Kennebec River Abenaki: *θ → n / #_ *θ → s / _k *θ → r Proto-...
brass tacks's user avatar
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4 votes

Possible diachronic developments of th sounds

Lateralization to l is also attested in Algonquian and Hawrami Kurdish (questions regarding voicing are not beside the point: in Hawrami the fricative is indeed ð, and in Algonquian it's just the fact ...
user6726's user avatar
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4 votes

West Germanic Th-Stopping

Spelling with -th- (15c.) reflects widespread phonetic shift in Middle English that turned -der to -ther in many words, perhaps reinforced in this case by Old Norse forms; spelling caught up to ...
Yellow Sky's user avatar
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4 votes

Any other example of "socially stigmatized phoneme" like the "th" sound in some Venetian dialect?

In any place where regional origin is associated with lower social status (basically, where internal migration in search of jobs and wages is/was important, or where a central political authority was ...
Luís Henrique's user avatar
3 votes

Any other example of "socially stigmatized phoneme" like the "th" sound in some Venetian dialect?

In Hindi the usage of only /s/ in the place of /ʃ/ /ʂ/ and /s/ generally makes one sound less educated. Same with the realization of the monophthongs /ɛː/ and /ɔː/ as diphthongs /əɪ/ and /əʊ/. These ...
Aryaman's user avatar
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3 votes
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When did the /θ/ sound die out in the continental Germanic languages?

Swedish seems to be the last holdout, as attested in the Gustav Vasa Bible published 1540-1.
user6726's user avatar
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2 votes

Any other example of "socially stigmatized phoneme" like the "th" sound in some Venetian dialect?

You'd be better off asking what languages don't have such a feature. An example from New York City English is the curl-coil merger, which pronounces curl/coil, verse/voice, loin/learn as homophones. ...
ubadub's user avatar
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1 vote

Allophones of dental fricatives (/θ/, /ð/) in English

It depends on what you mean by "allophone". Originally, "allophone" did not mean "the physical realization of a speech sound", it referred to a linguist's recording of ...
user6726's user avatar
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1 vote

Why is [ð] so rare?

I won't say that a voiced dental fricative is "so rare". With a frequency of 4.88% in the UPSID sample (see http://menzerath.phonetik.uni-frankfurt.de/upsid_find.html for a nice interface to the UPSID ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
1 vote

Any other example of "socially stigmatized phoneme" like the "th" sound in some Venetian dialect?

I imagine this happens to some extent in all languages with a prestige dialect and non-prestige dialects with distinctive realisations of phonemes. Some examples that come to mind: ceceo in ...
iacobo's user avatar
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