6

Earlier forms of the script such as Brahmi 𑀭 = r, 𑀲 = s as well as related script (Gurmukhi ਰ = r, ਸ = s), reveal that it is a coincidence. It is interesting to note that Tibetan ར = r, ས = s which are are significantly similar to Devanagari, but Bengali র = r, স = s which are not so similar. Yet Tibetan and Bengali scripts are classified as examples of ...


4

There were no "developers" or "creators" of Sanskrit, or any other language except conlangs. The scripts used for Sanskrit also evolved organically, from the original Brahmi script, and although Devanagari is normally used for Sanskrit today, other scripts have been used in the past. I don't think anybody sober has ever claimed that Devanagari contains ...


3

They are regional variants: Numerical Notation: A Comparative History, Stephen Chrisomalis (p.198, 199, 211) http://software.sil.org/downloads/r/annapurna/AnnapurnaSIL-features.pdf https://www.hindawi.com/journals/acisc/2015/193868/


3

This website may be of use. 1) The first one in your table (just the dot) is the anusvara, and is usually transliterated with aṃ (a + m with underdot) in the IAST standard. The second one (bowl and dot) is the chandrabindu, and is translated in the IAST standard with a◌̐ (a + Latin script version of the chandrabindu!). But because the phonetic differences ...


2

Fortunately, the very same source (Whitney's grammar) used in your conjunct consonants link also gives the frequencies of individual phonemes, which I will take to be an acceptable proxy for non-conjunct glyphs. If you are really interested in the frequency of non-conjunct glyphs but not the phonemes, then I can't help, sorry. Here is the relevant page.


2

Modern spelling correction algorithms work independent of language. However, their statistical models have to be trained for each individual target language. This blog post by Peter Norvig is a good place to start exploring.


2

The consonants that your link calls "hard" and "soft" are now usually called "voiceless" and "voiced" respectively. This is the standard terminology in modern linguistics.


2

"Soft" is not a meaningful linguistic term, though it may be used for various idiosyncratic purposes in a given language (e.g. in Slavic, soft consonants are palatalized. See this discussion. Tamil consonants are classed as hard, soft and medium. This split is invoked in Monier Wiliams' Practical Grammaar p. 14, and seems to refer to ghoṣavant, i.e. "voiced"...


1

As far as I know, the Devanagari script has no means to write the click sounds of the languages of Southern Africa (it surely hadn't that means in antiquity, and I am not aware of modern extensions of Devanagari to cover them). This example answers the first question asked. BTW, Devanagari was extended for some of the English vowel phonemes like the aw in "...


1

I have a feeling that these are regional. I've only ever used and read the standard "Bombay" forms (I'm actually from Delhi though).


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