4 votes

Are there any rankings of languages' rates of change?

None known to me. But, by default, rate of change is just difference divided by time. Assuming we know the time for each language pair we care about, then the question is just how to measure the ...
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4 votes

Difference between "Leiden school" and "mainstream" Indo-Europeanists?

Leiden school are people who propose some strict rules for PIE and strictly adhere to them. Strict root structure, no vowels except /o/ and /e/, three laryngeals etc. Their opponents are conservatives ...
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  • 6,261
3 votes

Time annotated corpus: plain text english corpus

There is a corpus of internet discussion boards that is split up into weekly files that spans 4 years. It is freely downloadable here: http://www.psych.ualberta.ca/~westburylab/downloads/usenetcorpus....
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  • 31
3 votes

What is the linguistic process behind prolonging of vowels?

It is not clear what you mean by "prolonged", but if you want to know how long vowels can appear in a language that earlier had none of them, one way of it is when a consonant between 2 vowels ...
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  • 16.3k
3 votes

Different assimilation directions

I believe that Chomsky and Halle's SPE theory predicts progressive assimilation of voice. For English morphologically simple forms, the only way you can have a weak word initial syllable followed ...
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  • 12.3k
3 votes
Accepted

When did Aspirated Consonants appear in English?

This thesis by Bruin argues that aspiration is a feature of Old English, as also argued for Germanic in various places by Iverson & Salmons. Aspiration i.e. positive VOT is one of those under-...
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  • 68.8k
3 votes

When did Aspirated Consonants appear in English?

I don't see how you reached the conclusion that Old English stops were unaspirated. Here is the most relevant reference I found: "T" and "p" were possibly pronounced exactly like in Modern English ...
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  • 12.3k
3 votes
Accepted

Is morphology always attributable to phonological processes?

It sounds like you are asking e.g. "why do we have a suffix -s for the plural", "why do we have a prefix un- for negatives", etc. The alternative would be to mark the function with a separate word ...
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  • 68.8k
2 votes
Accepted

Ioticism in Greek

Mergers to /i/ are not uncommon in general. The asymmetrical development of η, ει, ω, ου to [i, i, o, u] reminds me of how Middle English /ɛː/ /eː/ /ɔː/ /oː/ become early modern English [iː, iː, oː, ...
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  • 16.8k
2 votes

Is there any evidence that modern telecommunication slows dialect differentiation?

Consider two phenomena: Dialectal differences emerge in isolation. The more isolated a community is, from a linguistic perspective, the more likely it is that its dialect will differ from those of ...
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2 votes
Accepted

How did Norwegian "huske" derive from ON "hugsa"?

The addition of the letter s forms an iterative verb. There are more examples in Germanic languages, e.g. Low German hoppen "to hop", High German hopsen "to bounce, to lollop". The second step is ...
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2 votes

Difference between "Leiden school" and "mainstream" Indo-Europeanists?

Presumably 'the Leiden School' refers to the views of the professor (who is respected) there. To discover his views look at Kortlandt, Frederik 'Studies in Germanic, Indo-European and Indo-Uralic' (...
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1 vote

Time annotated corpus: plain text english corpus

Why do you need to download such corpus? The corpus managers enable you to search for these corpora better than to work with them on your own computers... You can see dozens of corpora in Sketch ...
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  • 91
1 vote

Is there any evidence that modern telecommunication slows dialect differentiation?

Yes. There is ample empirical evidence for it; the diversity of American English is not bigger than the diversity of British English, never mind the difference in size between the US and the UK. The ...
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