12 votes
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Diphthongs and macrons in Hawaiian

This is actually an interesting question, but in order to answer it properly I'll have to provide a brief introduction of Hawaiian vocalism. Let me start from the beginning. In Hawaiian, like in many ...
Tochtli's user avatar
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5 votes
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Absence of vowel combination /ou/ in Spanish

It seems this was a combination of: 'ou' being rare in Latin words and only in environments where vowels would undergo changes in the evolution to Spanish, and instances of vowel + consonant ...
iacobo's user avatar
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5 votes
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Why is the "long i" sound in English written /aɪ/?

In American dialects, the sound in 'hat' is generally /æ/, not /a/. The use of /i/ (meaning /ai/) in the 'fight' vowel would be too long/close; you probably do not pronounce 'might' exactly the same ...
Jeremy Needle's user avatar
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Is Old English ġe- a digraph representing [j]?

The Old English letter <­g> (specifically not using the overdot as that is a much later convention) is a fickle beast: it pulled double duty as it represented both /g/ (as in <­græf>) and /j/ (...
Darkgamma's user avatar
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5 votes

are there any languages that have sounds in diphthongs that don’t occur in isolation?

RP has [aɪ] and [aʊ] but no [a]. Phonemically you could analyse these as /æɪ/ or /ɑɪ/, or /æʊ/ or /ɑʊ/ respectively though
Tristan's user avatar
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are there any languages that have sounds in diphthongs that don’t occur in isolation?

Attic Greek lacked /w/ and /j/, but had diphthongs /aw/, /ew/, /aj/, /oj/. (It also lacked a short /u/, if you prefer to write /au eu/.)
Draconis's user avatar
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Diphthongisation in varieties of English

This pathway of falling diphthong > (long) monophthong > rising diphthong has happened several times in linguistic history. Cf. Classical Latin caelum /ˈkae̯.lum/ with falling diphthong, Vulgar Latin *...
Michaelyus's user avatar
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4 votes

Are the diphthongs "ae" and "ea" essentially identical?

Latin æ represented /ai̯~ae̯/ and monophthongized later to /e:/. The digraph simply ea represented the sequence /ea/. Old English æ represented the vowel /æ/ or /æ:/, and ea represented the diphthong ...
b a's user avatar
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4 votes

are there any languages that have sounds in diphthongs that don’t occur in isolation?

Standard Mandarin's monophthongs in the usual five vowel analysis /i, u, y, ə, a/ (Pinyin i, u, ü, e, a) [and even if you include the apical vowel /ɨ / or /ɹ̩~ɻ̩/ or /z̩~ʐ̩/, Pinyin i] mean that /o/ ...
Michaelyus's user avatar
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4 votes
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Are there any languages which don't have Diphthongs at all?

Yes, in fact this is generally the case in Bantu languages (there are hundreds) that vowel-vowel sequences other than same-vowel (i.e. long vowel) are two syllables. Likewise Tigrinya, Amharic and ...
user6726's user avatar
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Swahili stress with two vowels in a row, how does it work?

From an orthographic POV, stress is on the second to last vowel of the word ([púa] "nose", and if there is only a single orthographic vowel but there is an NC sequence before the vowel, the stress is ...
user6726's user avatar
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The ate-eight split?

There are obscure British accents where words spelled with eigh like eight can have a different vowel from words spelled with "long a" like late or words spelled with ay/ai/ey/ei. This is not ...
brass tacks's user avatar
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The ate-eight split?

In England the “Received Pronunciation” (RP) of “ate” is [ɛt], so it is not the same as “eight” [eit]. But the difference that you make, and that you perceive, is clearly based on the orthography: ...
fdb's user avatar
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Why d͡z is not considered two consonants

It really comes down to, what keeps the theory simple while still explaining all the data? In (Kenyan) Swahili, for example, there are affricates /t͡ʃ/ and /d͡ʒ/. We could just as easily call them ...
Draconis's user avatar
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4 votes

Is there research on which diphthongs are perceived by English speakers as single sounds?

The only definition of "single sound" that exists in phonology is "single segment", which is different from the phonetic view (whereby "church" has a bisegmental ...
user6726's user avatar
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3 votes

Why d͡z is not considered two consonants

This is basically the meaning of the tie-marker. If you write [d͡z], you are explicitly claiming that it is a single consonant (commonly known as an affricate); if you write [dz], you're not saying ...
user6726's user avatar
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Why is the "long i" sound in English written /aɪ/?

As user6726's answer mentions, IPA letters (like [i], [e], [ɪ], [ɨ], [a]) refer to ranges of sounds (phones); for vowel letters, these can be thought of as regions of the "vowel space" (which in turn ...
brass tacks's user avatar
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3 votes

Is there research on which diphthongs are perceived by English speakers as single sounds?

If it's a matter of perception, it would be fairest to say, I think, that a diphthong means precisely a cluster of vowels that speakers perceive and treat as a unit. For example, in elementary school ...
Luke Sawczak's user avatar
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What is an example of a language or dialect that contains triphthongs?

Portuguese certainly has triphtongs: Paraguai - /para'gwai/ luau - /lwaw/ Since the former is an import from Tupi-Guarani via Castillian, I would assume that Castillian has triphtogs too (I would ...
Luís Henrique's user avatar
2 votes

Why is the "long i" sound in English written /aɪ/?

There are indeed dialect issues. I presume you are aware that IPA letters represent regions of vowel articulation and not precise points. There is an informal transcriptional practice for vowels that ...
user6726's user avatar
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2 votes

Swahili stress with two vowels in a row, how does it work?

In words that are stressed regularly, the stress will be on the second last orthographic vowel or on a syllabic nasal if it is the second last syllable. (Unless the morpheme is only two syllables, as ...
Imralu's user avatar
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2 votes

The ate-eight split?

In some Northern Irish dialects of English, there is a 3 way distinction here, but not as you split it: [ɛ] ate says (take, make, lake, rake )1 2 (bag, fag (feg), gag (geg), lag, nag, rag)2 closed-...
iacobo's user avatar
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2 votes

Vowel change OE

The Germanic diphthong /au/ became /æa/ (spelled "ea") in stressed syllables. This dipthong was further subject to i-mutation. In the West Saxon dialects, i-mutation of "ea" was &...
siride's user avatar
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2 votes

Diphthong detection technique -- reference?

This is not a technical concept or method of linguistics that you can "look up" based on a name. It is related to something that linguists do, but again that practice doesn't have a specific ...
user6726's user avatar
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2 votes

are there any languages that have sounds in diphthongs that don’t occur in isolation?

RP's DRESS vowel is [ɛ]. Its FACE diphthong could be analysed as [ei] or [eɪ] (depending on whether the syllable is open or closed and whether the speaker is a HAPPY-tenser), in which case [e] occurs ...
Rosie F's user avatar
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2 votes

Why d͡z is not considered two consonants

There is no clear boundary between an affricate and a sequence of a stop and fricative of the same place of articulation. So the distinction most often comes down to the purpose of the analysis. For ...
Nardog's user avatar
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2 votes

How to distinguish between hiatus and a diphthong?

The most important first step is being explicit as to what distinction you are positing. Terms like "hiatus" and especially "diphthong" are often over-applied to refer to different ...
user6726's user avatar
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1 vote

Are there any languages which don't have Diphthongs at all?

Yes, most dialects of Yi under the Sino-Tibetan languages don't have diphthongs. Like Chinese, Yi characters are monosyllabic. Adjacent vowels, which appear when the second character in a word doesn't ...
lilysirius's user avatar
1 vote

Are the diphthongs "ae" and "ea" essentially identical?

As fdb said in a comment: These are not diphthongs. They are digraphs It probably is not too surprising that digraphs containing the letter "e" would be used to represent sounds in the ...
brass tacks's user avatar
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1 vote

Why is the "long i" sound in English written /aɪ/?

Bear with me, there are a few errors there. Error 1, Typically, brackets ([]) typically are used for precise pronunciations and slashes (//) are typically used for broad transcriptions. *A good ...
Matthew T. Scarbrough's user avatar

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