6 votes

Is ending a sentence with a possessive considered informal?

Here are the number of times that each possessive pronoun appeared at the end of each sentence in the British National Corpus per million words: spoken fiction magazine newspaper non-...
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5 votes

What is the difference between coreference resolution and anaphora resolution?

The answer by Tim Osborne is very comprehensive and accurate. But perhaps things might be easier when looked at through usage in text linguistics. Although, co-reference and anaphora can be distinct, ...
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5 votes

What other languages, apart from Latin, mix elements from different syntactic constituents? And why mixing?

In Latin, when part of a constituent "jumps over" an intervening word or phrase, as in your example, this is called hyperbaton. It is common in poetry, nor rare in rhetorical prose. It is ...
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  • 7,858
4 votes

Words that signal future content

User6726 is absolutely correct, but to expand a little bit: The "more to follow" idea comes from Gricean implicature, not from the words themselves. Grice's Maxims are four rules that people "expect"...
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  • 53.2k
3 votes
Accepted

Is there any method to summarize and gain the big picture from an article?

First, automated summarization is indeed a task in computational linguistics, although I suspect (I'm not really close to that particular field) that they employ some neural networks now and no longer ...
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3 votes
Accepted

Speech acts theory: (il)Locutionary acts

Locutionary and illocutionary verbs are not a thing, as far as I know. Locutionary and illocutionary acts on the other hand are well known to me and to others as well. I think an example will help you ...
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2 votes

What is the difference between coreference resolution and anaphora resolution?

The question is difficult to answer due to its brevity and the lack of context in which the terms coreference and anaphora appear. However, I can provide some orientation that should help increase ...
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  • 5,320
2 votes

Investigating the relevance maxim

If you do mean to refer to Grice's Maxim of Relevance, and the examples suggest you do, then you must understand that, unlike other maxims, it's impossible to violate the Relevance Maxim. This is ...
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  • 9,713
2 votes
Accepted

Do some communities prefer indirect discourses to direct discourses?

I think you're referring to what is known in social sciences as a high-context culture, a concept put forth by Edward Hall in the 1970s. Hall considered some cultures to be "lower-context", i.e. ...
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  • 4,762
2 votes

What is the difference between coreference resolution and anaphora resolution?

Coreference anaphora is just one type of anaphora. Following George Lakoff, syntacticians distinguish between identity-of-reference anaphora (which includes definite pronominalization) and identity-...
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  • 12.3k
2 votes

Words that signal future content

These words are nouns. The effect you're referring to doesn't come from those words. For example "That's why I rejected that idea", "I accepted his example", "As you know, Dr. Seuss wrote about two ...
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  • 68.7k
2 votes
Accepted

Is there any difference between Discourse Analysis and critical discourse analysis?

Discourse analysis isn't a theory (it makes no claims), it is an area of investigation. "Critical Discourse Analysis" is a specific theory of discourse analysis. I am not sure if "...
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  • 68.7k
1 vote
Accepted

Looking for a theory

There is a big discipline, not exactly linguistics, called rhetoric with literature going back to classic antiquity (e.g., Cicero). Figures of speech are a part of rhetoric and offer themselves as a ...
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1 vote

Is there any formal notion of how presenting an ontology causes people to think within that ontology?

You probably already know this, but the idea of frame semantics was largely pioneered by Chuck Fillmore from the realm of cognitive linguistics in the late 70s and 80s. Related figures are Ronald ...
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1 vote

Need an online freely available Anaphorically Annotated Corpus of English Language for Identification of Discourse Units

This one was just released a couple months ago and is available for download. https://github.com/synapse-developpement/Discovery If the anaphoric references are not to your liking, run the Hugging ...
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1 vote

Are there corpora which tag phrases by discourse- or conversational-function?

The SPAADIA, OASIS, and Switchboard corpora might interest you.
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  • 101
1 vote

Are there corpora which tag phrases by discourse- or conversational-function?

I'd take a look at 'dialog acts' rather than general purpose discourse functions. This is a good place to start: https://dialogbank.uvt.nl/wp-content/uploads/tdb/2015/12/DialogBank-LRE-v8.pdf It ...
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1 vote

Detect egoistical emotion

I don't think there is such a thing as "egoistical emotion" that can be detected. A huge part of the problem here is confusion between "egoistical" and "egotistical". All of your existing examples ...
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  • 2,585
1 vote

Different discounting methods with SRILM toolikt

GT is SRILM's default. In fact, I think using -addsmooth 0 just gives you default GT smoothing (unfortunately?). To directly use GT discounting, simply include no discounting argument. The number at ...
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1 vote

Which linguistic terms, concepts, theories are particularly associated with narrative writing?

The subdomains of discourse analysis, dialogics (Bakhtin), and the study of narrative discourse markers (Labov & Waletzky) may be of interest. There is significant literature on this topic, so ...
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  • 2,661
1 vote

What linguistic key terms are necessary to be understood in order to understand the idea behind discourse analysis?

For lists of the linguistic terms with their short explanation see these links: General linguistics terms - terms are grouped according to the field of linguistics, downloadable variant available. ...
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  • 16.3k
1 vote

If we can talk of "speech error", what do we call "narration error"?

This is not an authoritative answer. But, I'm not sure one exists. I'd never heard a neutral term for it, but I like your suggestion. It looks like people could almost use 'retelling error' (http://...
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1 vote

Can words like 'always' and 'never' be used to determine sentences inherently wrong?

I don't understand the relationship between the part of your question concerning economy of code lines and special words like "always", but it's possible you can find something of interest in the ...
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  • 12.3k
1 vote

Finding a classroom transcript (for discourse analysis)

A good starting point for the search for such kind of resources is the CLARIN Virtual Language Observatory (VLO). Alas, a naive search for "classroom transcript" gives only five hits at the time of ...
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