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10 votes

In which situations or societies do people not take turns to speak in conversations?

As an English Language teacher, I often have to explain to students who come from very different cultures that most English speakers are uncomfortable with long silences in conversations. So whereas, ...
Araucaria - him's user avatar
6 votes

Is ending a sentence with a possessive considered informal?

Here are the number of times that each possessive pronoun appeared at the end of each sentence in the British National Corpus per million words: spoken fiction magazine newspaper non-...
WavesWashSands's user avatar
5 votes

In which situations or societies do people not take turns to speak in conversations?

A common situation is where a listener has guessed (correctly or not) what the speaker is going to say next and starts to respond. Another is when one person feels they've been interrupted and wants ...
Darren Cook's user avatar
5 votes

What other languages, apart from Latin, mix elements from different syntactic constituents? And why mixing?

In Latin, when part of a constituent "jumps over" an intervening word or phrase, as in your example, this is called hyperbaton. It is common in poetry, nor rare in rhetorical prose. It is ...
Cerberus's user avatar
  • 7,996
4 votes

Words that signal future content

User6726 is absolutely correct, but to expand a little bit: The "more to follow" idea comes from Gricean implicature, not from the words themselves. Grice's Maxims are four rules that people "expect"...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 67.1k
4 votes

In which situations or societies do people not take turns to speak in conversations?

A common example is faculty meetings, when Distinguished Professors A, B and Q are free to butt in when they have an idea. Whether or not this works depends on the extent to which Irrelevant Professor ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.2k
3 votes
Accepted

Is there any method to summarize and gain the big picture from an article?

First, automated summarization is indeed a task in computational linguistics, although I suspect (I'm not really close to that particular field) that they employ some neural networks now and no longer ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
2 votes

Words that signal future content

These words are nouns. The effect you're referring to doesn't come from those words. For example "That's why I rejected that idea", "I accepted his example", "As you know, Dr. Seuss wrote about two ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.2k
2 votes
Accepted

Do some communities prefer indirect discourses to direct discourses?

I think you're referring to what is known in social sciences as a high-context culture, a concept put forth by Edward Hall in the 1970s. Hall considered some cultures to be "lower-context", i.e. ...
Nardog's user avatar
  • 4,951
2 votes

Is there any formal notion of how presenting an ontology causes people to think within that ontology?

You probably already know this, but the idea of frame semantics was largely pioneered by Chuck Fillmore from the realm of cognitive linguistics in the late 70s and 80s. Related figures are Ronald ...
Matthew Fulton's user avatar
2 votes

How could you study “cultural differences” using corpora?

Cultural differences include various aspects that can be observed in the use of honorifics, speech acts, and power dynamics among participants. For example, Upton and Connor (2001) examined politeness ...
An Average Linguist's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

Is there any difference between Discourse Analysis and critical discourse analysis?

Discourse analysis isn't a theory (it makes no claims), it is an area of investigation. "Critical Discourse Analysis" is a specific theory of discourse analysis. I am not sure if "...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.2k
1 vote

Quantative and statistical data in Critical Discourse Analysis

From my own experience in academia I would suggest to check with your supervisor. Some people are very hung up on only using certain methods that are traditional in a discipline, and will not like ...
Oliver Mason's user avatar
1 vote

Corpus Linguistics Major

There are a variety of software packages available for doing corpus analysis. When I was still working in the field, the most commonly used ones were WordSmith and AntConc. However, you can only do ...
Oliver Mason's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

Looking for a theory

There is a big discipline, not exactly linguistics, called rhetoric with literature going back to classic antiquity (e.g., Cicero). Figures of speech are a part of rhetoric and offer themselves as a ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
1 vote

Different discounting methods with SRILM toolikt

GT is SRILM's default. In fact, I think using -addsmooth 0 just gives you default GT smoothing (unfortunately?). To directly use GT discounting, simply include no discounting argument. The number at ...
Jeremy Needle's user avatar
1 vote

Finding a classroom transcript (for discourse analysis)

A good starting point for the search for such kind of resources is the CLARIN Virtual Language Observatory (VLO). Alas, a naive search for "classroom transcript" gives only five hits at the time of ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
1 vote

Are there corpora which tag phrases by discourse- or conversational-function?

The SPAADIA, OASIS, and Switchboard corpora might interest you.
Luke G's user avatar
  • 101
1 vote

Detect egoistical emotion

I don't think there is such a thing as "egoistical emotion" that can be detected. A huge part of the problem here is confusion between "egoistical" and "egotistical". All of your existing examples ...
abarnert's user avatar
  • 2,625

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