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Here are the number of times that each possessive pronoun appeared at the end of each sentence in the British National Corpus per million words: spoken fiction magazine newspaper non-acad academic misc hers 3.41 37.97 1.79 1.62 0.67 0.98 1.39 his 6.62 39.47 3.03 3.63 1.64 ...


3

Adverbs have long been called a ‘wastebasket’ category in syntax. Their definition is very general: adverbs are distinguished from adjectives, which modify nouns, by saying that ‘adverbs modify verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs’; to this one can add that they may also modify phrases and clauses as a whole. If something doesn’t fit nicely in some other ...


3

A register is usually a concept of social usage and is a property of a word or a phrase (e. g. a colloquial register, a high register, a low register, etc). A register by itself is not communicative and is dependend upon a social value of a communicative unit (a word or a phrase) attributed by a language speaker. It depends on sociolinguistic hierachy and ...


2

I would say that the primary thing going on in that routine is the break down of 'conversation repair'. The two interlocutors simply repeat the same conversation repair approach and do not learn from its failure. The constant repetition is what makes it funny. It is also interesting how through constant repetition, the players make the rather implausible ...


2

Good question. Your examples are convincing. As I see it, there are four possibilities: Fortunately is not a real sentence adverb; real sentence adverbs do modify the entire sentence. Fortunately does in fact modify a sentence, but this is obscured by ellipsis. The same adverb can be a sentence adverb in some sentences but not others. The term sentence ...


2

I think you're referring to what is known in social sciences as a high-context culture, a concept put forth by Edward Hall in the 1970s. Hall considered some cultures to be "lower-context", i.e. requiring more explicit information in communication, than others, but this model has been criticized as lacking empirical evidence (Cardon 2008). The model of high-...


1

The words keeping up cohesion are called cohesive devices. Note that this term leaves their part-of-speech assignment untouched, a cohesive device can be a word of any kind of speech or even a phrase.


1

Note that there are 2 ways of defining anaphors; the narrower definition you're using refers back to an antecedent; the broader definition includes cataphors, which refer forward to a later word or phrase, and exophors, which refer to something outside of the text (e.g. when you point and say "There it is!", "it" is an exophor). Anaphors can include: ...


1

The following answer by Canary Wharf was posted to the closed cross-posted version of the question on Academia. I am posting it here to save it from deletion: Ph.D. student in sociolinguistics here. Rhetoric is likely to be centered on how to make language do particular things. Communicating clearly, making and structuring arguments, persuasiveness, word ...


1

This is not an authoritative answer. But, I'm not sure one exists. I'd never heard a neutral term for it, but I like your suggestion. It looks like people could almost use 'retelling error' (http://cdp.sagepub.com/content/16/1/16.abstract), but haven't. I think it's a good candidate, though: 'retelling' seems to be the most precise term for what you ...


1

As for as I inferred, pragmatic focuses on impliticit meaning that z being conveyed with reference to specific context.. While discourse analysis focuses on communicative aspects..


1

As far as I understand it: Speaker 1: would you like to go for a drink? Speaker 2: great! what time? The discourse analysist would be looking at how this communicative event works mechanically whereas the pragmatist would be looking at underlying (implicit) meanings (in this case 'drink' means trip to the pub, for example).


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