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11 votes

Is there a difference between Belgian Dutch (i.e. Flemish) and Vlaams?

Vlaams is Flemish. Vlaams is the Flemish word for "Flemish". Whether to regard this as a separate language (that's vls) or as a variant/dialect/whatever of Dutch (nl-BE), seems to be a matter of ...
Omar and Lorraine's user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

Is there a difference between Belgian Dutch (i.e. Flemish) and Vlaams?

"Flemish" technically has a different meaning from "Belgian Standard Dutch" — the latter being the standard form of the Dutch language as spoken in Belgium, much like how "Holland" is often used as a ...
Zorf's user avatar
  • 320
6 votes
Accepted

Why is the English name for Bruges the same as the French despite that it's a Flemish city?

The "when" is actually pretty easy. Throughout the Anglo-Saxon Chronicles, up to at least 1052, we see spellings like "Brycge", which look like anglicized versions of the Flemish name. In Norman and ...
abarnert's user avatar
  • 2,625
6 votes

How intelligible are German and Dutch to each other?

What is the metric here? 42% of words? "Somewhat intelligible"? Some formula given parameters like years*7 + km*0.01 + difficulty*3? Dutch and German are different languages mit an armey un flot ...
Adam Bittlingmayer's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Are the set of Dutch tussenvoegsels finite?

The Rijksdienst voor Identiteitsgegevens (RVIG) maintains "table 36" with tussenvoegsels (they call them voorvoegsels): https://publicaties.rvig.nl/Landelijke_tabellen/...
Keelan's user avatar
  • 4,221
5 votes
Accepted

Proximity of Dutch and German explained by the history of language

Well, the language vs. dialect question is not really a linguistic one but more a political one: A language is a dialect with an army and a navy. By this criterion, Dutch is clearly a language. But ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Did Dutch ever have a G like in Garden sound?

It is generally held that in proto-Germanic, [g] and [γ] are in an allophonic relation, likewise [b,d] and [β,ð], similar to the situation in Spanish. Word-initially, the stops [b,d] are posited as ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.2k
4 votes

Does the Dutch sentence "Waarschijnlijk deze zomer ga ik naar Spanje" follow the V2 structure?

This is a very bad sentence in Dutch : "Waarschijnlijk deze zomer ga ik naar Spanje." The normal word order would be Deze zomer ga ik waarschijnlijk naar Spanje. The referential adverbial in ...
A. ter Meulen's user avatar
4 votes

possible etymologies and cognates for Dutch 'mooi'?

Wiktionary has a rather plausible etymology of mooi: From Middle Dutch moy, from Old Dutch *mōi* (“nice, pleasant, clean”), from Proto-Germanic *mawjaz (“clean, washed”), from Proto-Indo-European *...
Yellow Sky's user avatar
  • 18.5k
4 votes
Accepted

When did Dutch lose its Aspirated Consonants

This is a very difficult question to answer on documentary evidence. A quotation from Schrijver (2014) Language Contact and the Origins of the Germanic Languages, pp. 123: [I]t is unclear when ...
Michaelyus's user avatar
  • 7,516
4 votes
Accepted

Did the Dutch "zee" (sea) and "meer" (lake) diverge or did the German "das Meer" (sea) and "der See" (lake) diverge from a shared linguistic heritage?

The word Meer¹ has as its original meaning something like "stagnating water", see also the related word Moor "swamp". Also the word See² originally had both meanings, and it was originally masculine. ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
3 votes

Why is the English name for Bruges the same as the French despite that it's a Flemish city?

It looks like it's not just an exception for Flanders. It occurs with some other European places, so it might be the same reason why English says (or said): Rome, Aix-la-Chapelle (traditional English),...
jlliagre's user avatar
  • 240
2 votes

Did the Dutch "zee" (sea) and "meer" (lake) diverge or did the German "das Meer" (sea) and "der See" (lake) diverge from a shared linguistic heritage?

Given that - Slavic languages also use a root similar to "mere" for the sea RU: "mor'e", UA: "more", PL: "morze" - Romance language have similar roots: LAT: "mare", ES: "mar" etc I'd imagine that ...
Sergey's user avatar
  • 21
2 votes
Accepted

Are most dialect in Flanders influenced by French?

You are surely right to say that Flemish is more strongly influenced by French than is the language of the Netherlands. This is the result of the situation until the 1960s, when Belgium was basically ...
fdb's user avatar
  • 24.3k
2 votes

Are most dialect in Flanders influenced by French?

This is remarkable, a Germanic language influenced by a Romance language. English is a well-known example of such a language, so I don't understand the surprise. Now, my question is: Is Flemish ...
MWB's user avatar
  • 1,122
2 votes

Does the Dutch sentence "Waarschijnlijk deze zomer ga ik naar Spanje" follow the V2 structure?

The sentence "Waarschijnlijk deze zomer ga ik naar Spanje" is completely incorrect Dutch, as mentioned by someone else. You can say "Waarschijnlijk ga ik deze zomer naar Spanje.". You are dealing ...
Elisa's user avatar
  • 21
2 votes

How intelligible are German and Dutch to each other?

I would expect that to vary somewhat from speaker to speaker. Key drivers probably include how many other languages that person speaks and/or how easily they pick up languages, and what regional ...
user149408's user avatar
2 votes

Syntax of Ik ben het beu

This is indeed an object with a copula but not a direct object (leidend voorwerp). If it were a direct object you should be able to turn it passive, which is not possible. This type of object is ...
Lu Kas's user avatar
  • 121
2 votes
Accepted

Syntax of Ik ben het beu

This construction is reminiscent of a Dutch "verb of innocence", such as Ik ben het vergeten (lit. I1 am2 it3 forgotten4, "I forgot (it)." ), where the grammatical subject is specifically marked as ...
Mark Beadles's user avatar
  • 6,870
2 votes

Did Dutch ever have a G like in Garden sound?

Although not answering your question, I think it is important to note that your hypothesis of the 'hard g' sound [g] not being present in Modern Dutch is incorrect. Neglecting the obvious loan-words ...
Djembo's user avatar
  • 29
2 votes

Similarity between Norwegian and Danish compared to other languages?

The map question is apparently based on this, where the conclusions (apparently) are based on lexicostatistical computation. This probably does allow you to say compare the relatedness-numbers for ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.2k
1 vote

How do you attest that two modal particles in different languages are of similar semantic attributes?

To say that two utterances in one or more languages are semantically "similar", you have to have some kind of atoms of semantic representation. It is easy to find two sentences where someone ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.2k
1 vote
Accepted

How do you attest that two modal particles in different languages are of similar semantic attributes?

The way I would do it is: Get a (large-ish) corpus of sentence-aligned translated texts, both NL->EN and EN->NL. collect all sentences with well and then find their respective translations. In ...
Oliver Mason's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

How similar are Low German and Dutch?

Stadard Dutch is different from Low German (Niederdeutsch) in being Low Franconian (Niederfränkisch). There is a Low German dialect in the Netherlands, Gronings, that is a recognised regional language....
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
1 vote

Where to download phonetic word list for Dutch/ Nederlandse fonetische woordenlijst downloaden

Wiktionary has IPA for many Dutch words. If you're looking for a list of basic words with an English spelling based phonetic representation, https://www.dummies.com/languages/dutch-for-dummies-cheat-...
Tomlish's user avatar
  • 43
1 vote

DP acting as AdvP?

Is it possible for a DP like "three times" to act as an AdvP ("He read the book three times.")? You're confusing terminology here. The DP loosely "acts as an AdvP" in the sense that it's modifying ...
abarnert's user avatar
  • 2,625
1 vote

"uitsluitend", logic of its double meaning

It is exactly as you say. "uitsluitend" is the present participle of uitsluiten, which means to exclude. Also it's an adjective meaning "exclusive". I am sure you could find exactly this information ...
Omar and Lorraine's user avatar
1 vote

What is the influence of Germanic languages on Esperanto grammar?

There is a significant portion of root words derived from Germanic languages, e.g., drinki (to drink alcoholic beverages), trinki (to drink), hundo (dog), jaro (year), verŝajne (probably), bedaŭrinde (...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
1 vote

Beginner to Dutch language: should I translate Dutch to English or to German?

Well, There are much more similarities either etymologically or grammatically in order to translate Dutch vocabulary into German (rather than into English): NL: Ik heb je/u niet verstaan. -> DE: ...
Armin's user avatar
  • 173

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