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13

This is an interesting question, though it really is a question of history or statistics, rather than linguistics. The "most spoken language in history" is certainly a modern language, just because the world population increased exponentially in the past few centuries. Most human languages last for a few hundred to a thousand or so years before it ...


5

It is questionable whether there is such a thing as "assimilation of manner" in the same sense that there is assimilation of place. Assimilation of place traditionally refers to wholesale shift in POA as represented in the IPA charts, to t → p, p → k and so on: columns of cells identify a "place". "Manner" cross-classifies rows ...


3

If you’re using what I understand to be the ‘classic’ rhetorical terms, I think this is litotes: using a negative statement (‘not tall’) to convey an understated positive one (‘short’). This term is included on this Wikipedia page with many others: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_rhetorical_terms (As an aside, I want to note the structure of your ...


2

Do you mean 'most' as an absolute number or as a percentage of world population? The other answers seem to interpret it as an absolute number so I will look at the percentage. The proportion of the world population that lives in China has varied from around 20% to around 40% from 400 BC until now (source wikipedia). English on the other hand only existed ...


2

The words Dutch, French, English, and Spanish are general adjectives which could refer to a person, clothing, language, architecture etc. There are some words that only refer to people, such as "Dutchman, Frenchman, Englishman" with -man, and Spaniard with -iard. There are a handful of other constructions with -man including Scotsman, Irishman, ...


2

In good boy, /ɡʊb bɔɪ/, we see that the last consonant of good has become a /b/. In isolation the last consonant of good would be a /d/. If we give these two phonemes their Voice Place Manner labels, /d/ would be a ᴠᴏɪᴄᴇᴅ ᴅᴇɴᴛᴀʟ ᴘʟᴏsɪᴠᴇ and /b/ would be a ᴠᴏɪᴄᴇᴅ ʙɪʟᴀʙɪᴀʟ ᴘʟᴏsɪᴠᴇ. So we can see that whilst the last consonant of good is still voiced and still ...


1

Natural Language in NLP refers to the linguistic material naturally occurring in a text, whether that is words, phrases, sentences, etc. Since NLP is not specific to a given language and not bound to one particular unit of language, I would go with it being uncountable. The Language in NLP is likely closest to definition 8 in the link you provided.


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