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You were on the right track! However, the morphology is a little more tricky than just person, number, and tense. Classical Nahuatl verbs have the basic form: subject prefix + object prefix + verb stem + subject number Now this doesn't include tense nor mood which can be prefixes or suffixes which greatly complicates things, not to mention the multitude of ...


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The usual syllable division given for sequences like /ɪh/ in English is /ɪ.h/. Lax vowels can end syllables in some contexts "English syllables don't end in lax vowels such as /æ ʌ ʊ ɪ/ etc" is not actually easy to support as an exceptionless rule, so most theories of syllabification recognize exceptions. The most obvious example of a word with a ...


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There's a dialect question as to what the pronunciation of "behave" is – I say [bəˈhɛiv], Jlawler says (I guess) [biˈhɛiv]. I say [biˈhɛd] but I've heard [bəˈhɛd]. We grew up in different towns, I think. You can't have the lax vowels in unstressed open syllables, which is why I reduce it to schwa, and it's just random chance as far as selecting a ...


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Linguists generally distinguish literal entailment vs. pragmatic implicature. As for literal entailment, "A or B" mean "A or B" and if A and B both happen to be true, that's okay as well. But "Chicken or beef" literally is not a proposition and it has no truth value. However, the construction pragmatically implies "You are ...


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Tl;dr I wouldn't attribute it to quill pens at all. One important thing to remember is that spelling has not always been uniform. Unlike many other languages, English has never had a central authority that decides what is proper English and what isn't; in the early 19th century, Noah Webster decided to overhaul spelling in his dictionary, and because of that ...


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I'm one of the two people who suggested that term. I'm completely fine with having the plural be "animae". The only reason I didn't like it is that I'm not familiar with any other "-ae" plural occuring in English, and at least when pronounced in the way one would (I think) use in German, it just sounds awful to me. So the main reason I &...


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CommonCrawl crawls the web and freely provides its archives and datasets to the public. Common Crawl's web archive consists of petabytes of data collected since 2011. It completes crawls generally every month. It's a few billion pages (petabytes of data). You can find versions of it that are already cleaned, de-duplicated and split by language. https://...


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In the third volume of his Accents of English (pp.550-1), Wells notes that, in the southern United States, dark /l/ may be realised as velar [ʟ] rather than velarised alveolar [ɫ], especially in the sequence /əl/. I've also heard anecdotal reports of dark /l/ being produced as [ʟ] by speakers from the UK but am not aware of any published work corroborating ...


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