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As indirectly acknowledged in the question, an adjective that precedes the noun it modifies generally cannot itself take a post-dependent (i.e. a dependent that follows its head), which means if it DOES take a post-dependent, it should follow the noun instead, e.g. (1) *the fluffy in the center bread (2) the bread fluffy in the center (3) *the proud of his ...


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The term ‘pre-fortis clipping’ refers not only to the shortening of vowels, but also any sonorants (i.e. approximants or nasals) that may intervene before the fortis obstruent in the coda of the syllable. The reason given in the blog for the invention of the term pre-fortis clipping is indeed that the previously used term shortening can cause confusion—...


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What about translating literally some Norwegian expressions? I've heard someone says "it wasn't only-only" before now, with a thick accent of course. "only-only" is not a recognisable English phrase. It could only be a literal translation of "bare bare" (for those that don't know Norwegian, this is an idiomatic way to say "...


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The English word “obtain” derives from the Latin verb obtineo, directly or via French obtenir. In Latin it is usually transitive (“to hold, maintain, acquire”), but it can also be intransitive (“to maintain itself; to hold, prevail, last, stand, continue” according to the Lewis/Short Latin dictionary). English borrowed it in both meanings in the early New ...


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From Ancient Greek ἀ- from Proto-Indo-European n̥-, which is a zero-grade prefix form of ne, which meant "not".


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Yes, accent modification certainly exists. In the classical bel canto tradition, a specifically prescribed form of pronunciation exclusively for singing is generally required, taught in a very precise way through (lyric) diction classes. Many a tome has been devoted to this subject e.g. Adams (2007) for the major operatic languages of 18th and 19th century ...


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It is a matter of linguistic pragmatics. A typical statement has a topic, also known as theme or given (what is being talked about) and a comment or rheme (the new information about the topic). In 1843 Weil noticed the tendency of actual language used to reflect a topic - comment word order (what he called 'the march of ideas'); this is especially true when ...


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