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2 votes
Accepted

Suffix in word 'scenario'

By certain standards, it can be considered to be a suffix (in English). It shows up in a number of words, at greater than chance frequency. If it is a suffix, you expect to be able to find the ...
  • 70.1k
3 votes
Accepted

Is it not plausible that English "wraith" could be connected to Proto-Germanic "*wraith-" or its derivatives?

Wraiths do not appear to be particularly vengeful (as revenants go) so a connection to wroth < Proto-Germanic *wraiþaz is not as semantically clear as it might seem. Phonologically we run into ...
  • 5,040
2 votes

Are there any dialects of English which ⟨i⟩ in unstress syllable will be realized as [ɪ]?

Contrary to the assumptions apparently underlying your question, the variation in pronunciation of words beginning with di- (dilute, direct, dilemma, diverse, etc.) between /ɪ/ (which may further be ...
  • 4,782
0 votes

Are there any dialects of English which ⟨i⟩ in unstress syllable will be realized as [ɪ]?

I don't know of any evidence that "dilute" should be [daɪˈlut] in English, but some people do pronounce it that way. So we can inquire into why there is variation in pronunciation. It does ...
  • 70.1k
10 votes

Pronunciation of D sound in British English

In the examples you cite, there is no [d] in most dialects of American English, it is replaced with the flap [ɾ]. Thus "writer" and "rider" are phonetically identical, though given ...
  • 70.1k
11 votes

Pronunciation of D sound in British English

American English speakers tend to reduce /d/ to a flapped [ɾ] between vowels, while British English speakers generally don't. This means an RP /d/ can sound a lot "stronger" than an American ...
  • 53.9k
0 votes

Heads, classifiers

Mong is a classifier language. A classifier to us, is not a counter word, but an introduction of a noun that puts that noun into similar characteristics as other applicable nouns that are being ...

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