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0

A spectrogram always has some non-zero amplitude value at all frequencies, even when it seems there is nothing there (values like 5.1e-007). Two main properties determine what frequencies are "seeable". First is sampling rate: a recording made at 48K has values up to 24K and absolutely nothing above, and one made at 22K maxes out at 11K. This is a ...


9

All the following information comes from Christopher Upward's The History of English Spelling: Words that lost initial ‘h’: OE hlaf ModE ‘loaf’ OE hlud ModE ‘loud’ OE hlædder ModE ‘ladder’ OE hlafdiȝe ModE ‘lady’ OE hliehhan ModE ‘to laugh’ OE hlid ModE ‘lid’ OE hnecca ModE ‘neck’ OE hnæȝan mod ‘neigh’ OE hreddan ModE ‘to rid’ OE hreoȝ ModE ‘rough’ OE hrycȝ ...


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For the Old English nouns the division into “weak” and “strong” is less important than the division into stem types. Nouns like boc --> bec are called “root-stems” or “consonant stems” since their stems ended in consonants, these are “strong”, here's a list: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Category:Old_English_consonant_stem_nouns. As for verbs, Old ...


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Well, yes, it is finite. It would only rise to infinite if you have a sentence with infinitely many words. And Computational Linguistics is an entire field based around going off of viable patterns in order to construct sentences with an AI. English is Adjective-Frontal SVO, and it is only as such because that's what it became over its development. For ...


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I believe you're looking for pleonasm. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pleonasm


-1

I found a picture on Wikipedia which lead me to believe that it was ðe old English long 'a' which evolved into modern English 'oa' as in 'hláf' to 'loaf' and 'gát' to 'goat' or sometimes 'o_e' as in 'hám' to 'home' or 'bán' to 'bone'. Ðis change does not take place if ðe 'a' is short, so if ðou have a textbook or oðer reference which marks long vowels wiþ ...


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Since you tagged this "phonology" rather than "phonetics": There are a few different ways of representing the second syllable of words like "mirror" in rhotic dialects. Some people treat it as a combination of a vowel /ə/ and a consonant; other people treat it as a syllabic resonant /ɹ̩/. (The same goes for the second syllable ...


4

If you look at official IPA charts (here, here), you won't find the letter /ɚ/ anymore. Esling's chart (the second of those) exemplifies the rhoticity diacritic on regular schwa (ə plus rhotic-hook, i.e. [ ə˞ ], analogous to [a˞] and so on. All that means is, "whatever the vowel is, plus a rhotic quality", which can be any kind of rhotic ...


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