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9

There is no universally accepted term. How you describe such a thing depends on context. For instance, in second language acquisition people differentiate between error and mistake the first being a sign of a systematic lack of competence in a particular area whereas the latter is just an accident that does not signify anything about the speaker's ability ...


8

Recognizing accents is a relatively easy task... for people. Identifying the native language of writers is an actively researched field of Computational Linguists. So active that the field, "Native Language Identification", has its own conferences now. I paste from their website: Native Language Identification (NLI) can be useful for a number of ...


5

Yes, there are differences. From my experiences as a copy editor: Native speakers of Russian or Chinese (both languages don't have articles) have difficulties with articles, either leaving them out very often or overdoing them Native speakers of Chinese have difficulties with tenses and with the third person singular marker on the verb Native speakers of ...


3

This is a much more complex and fraught question than it may seem. There are really two questions: Do speakers of different languages make some errors influenced by their first language? The answer here is, yes, of course. Sometimes it's called L1 interference or transfer and has been studied extensively. Contrastive linguistics (mentioned by @jlawler) ...


3

Science must be reproducible, and closely connected to experimental data. This has consequences on scientific practice, and in particular on the how experimental resources and copora should be dealt with, which can be translated in what I would consider rules of scientific ethics (which are not confined to linguistics): A corpus of data should be precisely ...


3

Learner English by michael swan enumerates all the ways non-native English speakers make errors. Grouped by language, this book is quite extensive. False cognates, word order, lack of tenses used, article usage, etc


2

Polish (and i think also Russian) people have often problems with differencing vowel's length (as they do not do it in their native language). Which often results in changing "sheep" into "ship" and "sheet" into... You know what. In most other languages, even ones very closely related to Polish like Czech, vowel length is differenciated so they don't tend ...


2

In Aspects of the theory of syntax, Chomsky distinguished "grammatical error" from language "performance error". In Slips of the tongue, Fromkin distinguished spoonerisms, which conform to a language's phonotactics, from other speech errors.


2

Insofar as the purpose of identifying mistakes is proofreading, the classification of mistakes is less important than the identification thereof. The difference between a spelling and a grammar mistake may depend on context, especially when dealing with verb forms. Omitting an s from the third person singular of the simple present tense could be construed as ...


1

Wikipedia mentions mistake as a linguistic term in the context of language learners, found at Error (linguistics) (via Malapropism) citing H. Douglas Brown (1994) for a definition a failure to utilize a known system correctly I see no reason not to apply that to L1 speakers, unless there's a specific term to note the distinction. Linguistics has ...


1

Cacography is deliberate misspelling intended to convey humorous sense or just exaggerating someone's illiteracy. See also Sensational spelling. It has similar effect, but using literate, but rare or dialectal spelling of a word or phrase. (sorry for essentially copy-pasting my own answer at ELL.SE)


1

They're both ungrammatical, but it's clear that what's happened is misplacing the final {-Z}. It's mean should be It means, and it owns should be its own. It could easily happen in a transcript of spoken material, or it could happen during speech by a learner. Personally, I find those little intrusive {-Z} morphemes in English, like English articles and ...


1

I am having trouble parsing both of those sentences. Even if I make the change from "It's mean" to "It means", example one is still is not grammatical. "show, showed" and "the realism, the word realism" double up the verb and direct object of the subordinate clause in a non-standard way. The only way I can make sense of this is in oral speech where the ...


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