6 votes

What is the most archetypal phonemic-tone system?

The notion of “most typical tone lnguage” can be understood in terms of specific properties that are most typically encountered in tone systems (not counting the number of speakers of each language, ...
  • 70.4k
6 votes

House vs. home in other languages

Many Romance languages have this distinction. In addition to French foyer noted by @Philippe, there are the Romance cognates Spanish hogar, Galician fogar, with the meaning of "home", from Vulgar ...
  • 6,782
4 votes

House vs. home in other languages

In Russian, both house and home are the same, дом [dom], but in Ukrainian (which is closely related to Russian) the same word, дім [dʲim] (gen. sg. дому ['dɔmu]) is usually used to mean home, while ...
  • 16.4k
4 votes

House vs. home in other languages

In French, the terms "foyer" and "chez soi" express the concept of home with a strong nuance of "one's family' for the first (foyer is originally the fireplace, and by extension the hearth), while the ...
  • 256
2 votes

House vs. home in other languages

In Russian there are adverbs дома and домой similar to English adverb "home" (as in go home, at home) Я дома = I am at home (adverb) Я в доме = I am in the house (noun) Я иду домой = I am going ...
  • 6,167
1 vote

House vs. home in other languages

In Czech and Slovak they are two different words (unlike Russian where дом can be both). Czech: dům - house domov - home doma, domů - at home, (towards) home originates in Proto-Slavic *dȏmъ - ...
1 vote

House vs. home in other languages

In addition to (o)uchi, Japanese has furusato which is translated to hometown. With nuisance, however the area in which one grew up is more accurate than the mapped borders of the town. Japanese ...
1 vote

House vs. home in other languages

In Hindi घर (ghar) can mean both "house" and "home". मकान (maka:n) only means "house" but is a pretty common word nevertheless.
  • 857
1 vote
Accepted

"I should have bought a present. Susie did": is this an example of anaphora?

Yes, it's anaphora, but it isn't referential anaphora. Following George Lakoff, most now distinguish identity of meaning anaphora (here the deleted V' is interpreted to mean the same as its ...
  • 12.2k
1 vote

Where to find lists of examples of linguistic phenomena

Assuming that you want data that would be suitable for problem sets, you could start with Gleason's Workbook in descriptive linguistics, and Ronald Langacker's textbook Fundamentals of linguistic ...
  • 70.4k
1 vote

Where to find lists of examples of linguistic phenomena

It depends on your linguistic viewpoint. For typology, a good wealth of examples can be found in WALS online.

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