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This article on Georgian phonetics suggests that there is no definite answer, because the phonetic realization varies contextually including according to speaker. Listening to two speakers of Georgian pronouncing the letter ღ=γ, the male speaker uses a uvular and the female uses a posterior velar. Also compare ხ=x where the same female speaker uses a ...


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This work by Butskhrikidze is reasonably detailed though not comprehensive: you can follow the references therein to expand the coverage. I would also include Ritter "Georgian consonant clusters: The complexity is in the structure, not the melody", which was published later, but which is more a theoretical interpretation in a particular framework.


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These acoustic phenomenons, transcribed in the IPA, as /ɣ x/, /ʁ χ/ : Probably fall within allophone spheres for Georgian speakers, that is, there is not minimal pair between /ʁ/ or /ɣ/ in Georgian, so both are valid realisations of the letter "ღ". It might be that one or the other are more common in some dialects or in some phonetic ...


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Even if you uppercase something you still need to support your claim with some proof, because otherwise one can come up with a refutation similar in it's nature, like this one: No, it DOES have something to do with Ashkenazi. See, it's not that convincing per se, so I'll provide some explanation. Jews have a long-documented history of adopting same name ...


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