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There's no terminology that generically describes all such differences, but the most likely kind of difference, what I suppose you have in mind, relates to the idea of a "verb form" – under that heading you would include for instance "saw", "seeing", "seen". In English, verbs can have a number of forms depending on ...


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Are you aware of CCGbank (Hockenmaier, 2003)? This is the largest-scale corpus of English text annotated with CCG categories, consisting of ~1 million tokens of text, and is derived semi-automatically from the Penn Treebank. This was used by Clark & Curran (2007) in a line of work to train wide-coverage dependency parsers for English, which made use of ...


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By "generativism", I assume you mean "the theory of Generative Grammar". This is a theory promulgated by Chomsky starting, in one form, in 1951. It came to be known as "generative grammar" with the publication of Aspects of the theory of syntax (see chapter 1). The word "generate" is taken from mathematics, with ...


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For general use as an argument: You need EITHER a silent determiner (or another head) that converts <e,t> to either <<e,t>,t> or e OR a theory of coercion that performs its function for you. Needless to say, I prefer the former. However, "in other words, an expression of type <e, t> cannot combine with another expression of type &...


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