3 votes

Is ‘for’ a complementizer or a preposition in ‘prefer for John to stay’

there is some confusion in the other answers to this question. let me be clear: on any understanding of the term "complementizer," the word for is indeed a complementizer in the context you give. for ...
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2 votes

The classification of morphemes

• Are the two featured categorizations correct? They do look correct, from my point of view. Unfortunately, you haven't mentioned whose exactly point of view you would like your categorizations to be ...
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2 votes

Roots categorization

This is a common issue in Austronesian linguistics where the notion of precategorial (=functionally unspecified) roots is often employed to explain the fact that roots don't have a POS category until ...
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2 votes
Accepted

Roots categorization

Yes, some linguists consider this possible. Here are some such concepts/authors: "roots": Pesetsky, David. 1995.Zero syntax: Experiencers and cascades (CurrentStudies in Linguistics 27). ...
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2 votes

Roots categorization

Your hypothesis is true, partially. Tamil employs agglutinative grammar. Suffixes may be used to mark noun class, number, case, verb tense and other grammatical categories. Wikipedia has a great ...
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  • 164
1 vote

Category & Function

[1] They are fond of bull-fighting, [which I find quite repulsive]. [2] My wife hated the fact [that the children left their clothes strewn across the floor]. You are right: the bracketed element in [...
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  • 790
1 vote

Understanding "inflection" and "grammatical category"

The Wikipedia article means part of speech when it says grammatical category. While the statement is true (with some caveats, participles are counted as inflected, but categorised as verb forms ...
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1 vote

Is ‘for’ a complementizer or a preposition in ‘prefer for John to stay’

That "for" is a complementizer. If it were a preposition, it would take an object which could be pronominalized with "it" or "that", but *"John won't stay though I'd prefer for it". On the other ...
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1 vote

Is ‘for’ a complementizer or a preposition in ‘prefer for John to stay’

I personally would say that it is not a complementizer. For instance, if we compare the sentences: (1) Mark prefers for John to stay (2) John prefers to stay I personally want to think of (1) and (2)...
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  • 2,324
1 vote

Grammatical category definition

A grammatical category of a language is a non-terminal symbol of a context free grammar of the language. A morphological category is a non-terminal which appears on the left of a phrase structure rule ...
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