12 votes

Is there a name for the phenomenon of some words being more deeply embedded in a language than others?

You could say that English do is more "grammaticalized" than German tun, and German werden is more grammaticalized than English become. Section II of "The Grammaticalization of Aspectual Auxiliary ...
brass tacks's user avatar
  • 18.1k
8 votes
Accepted

How do new function words develop in a language?

The process is known as "grammaticalization", and there is a ginormous literature on the topic. There are very many sources: here are a couple of examples. Many languages have a an ...
user6726's user avatar
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6 votes
Accepted

What does Eastern Aramaic have to say about "(definite) articles are acquired, not lost"?

Yes, Aramaic through the ages has had a more-or-less complete cycle attested, thanks to its long documented history. Yaudic Aramaic as attested on the inscriptions at Zencirli appears not to have any ...
Michaelyus's user avatar
  • 7,466
3 votes

Is there a name for the phenomenon of some words being more deeply embedded in a language than others?

I think, a reasonable answer to your question may be "yes", but a number of terms actually covers what you are writing about. Just like is shown in the post of @sumelic, "deep embedding" exhibits the ...
Aharon M. Vertmont 's user avatar
3 votes

Are there any examples of neopronouns for non-binary or third gender people being fully incorporated into a language's grammar?

The case of hen in Swedish is the closest example I know of. hen does have a generic usage for people of unknown gender---so it does not fit your question exactly---but in most cases without explicit ...
Christian's user avatar
  • 199
3 votes
Accepted

Is Russian "там [холодно]" a case of degrammaticalization?

If I understand you correctly, you are interested in там in the sense of "outside/outdoors." Here are more examples for you: Talking about the weather: Там идет снег? Там идет дождь? Там такая ...
Alex B.'s user avatar
  • 8,744
2 votes

Is the English "because (noun)" an instance of grammaticalization?

It would be a good example of an instance of grammaticalisation if it was perceived as a regular construction to say in English, but I would claim it isn't: The construction because + NOUN (or because ...
Natalie Clarius's user avatar
2 votes

What is the difference between grammaticalization and grammaticization?

The difference seems to be how you frame the concept. From Hopper and Traugott's book, some linguists believe that grammaticalisation could be understood as 'entering the grammar of a language', i.e. '...
WavesWashSands's user avatar
2 votes

What are some common diachronic origins of interrogative pro-forms?

I think one example that might be a richer source of "the origins of interrogatives" is Chinese, from Old Chinese (Classical texts) to Middle Chinese (Literary Chinese texts) to modern topolects of ...
Michaelyus's user avatar
  • 7,466
1 vote

Timeline of future/conditional in Latin and Romance languages

The Conditional and Neo-Future are present in the vast majority of the Romance languages. To my knowledge the only Romance languages which lack them are Sardinian and the various Balkan Romance ...
Tristan's user avatar
  • 8,322
1 vote

What does Eastern Aramaic have to say about "(definite) articles are acquired, not lost"?

It’s not a universal. In fact, it’s most probably a cycle, as with other constructions undergoing grammaticalisation. In many Slavic languages, the definite or indefinite forms became the only ones ...
Atamiri's user avatar
  • 2,590
1 vote

Is there a name for the phenomenon of some words being more deeply embedded in a language than others?

In general, entrenchment is the term you are looking for. Words that are used more often are more ready at hand. Our choice of words is dominated by more frequent words, e.g. rather talking about ...
Abas's user avatar
  • 215
1 vote

Is the English "because (noun)" an instance of grammaticalization?

This isn't grammaticalization, because grammaticalization is a process whereby a lexical word becomes a grammatical marker, a.k.a. a functional word (or morpheme). For example, the English future ...
TKR's user avatar
  • 10.9k
1 vote

What is the difference between grammaticalization and grammaticization?

Otherwise: none. In German, grammatikalisch/grammatisch is also being used arbitrarily by some, and distinctively by others. Personally, I use it just like the word system: systemic = regarding the ...
purlupar's user avatar
  • 638

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