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17

Indeed, the Ancient Greek word εὕρηκα would be transcribed heurēka, with an H. The mark that looks like an apostrophe (the "rough breathing" or "spiritus asper") indicates the H sound. However, the word came to English through Latin, which is why it's pronounced with the accent on the second syllable instead of the first (as in Greek). ...


5

Greek keraía comes from Ancient kerás "horn", from Proto-Indo-European *ḱerh₂-, cognate with English "horn" (and also the second half of "unicorn", via Latin, and various others in other languages). There's been some suggestion that this word could be related to Proto-Semitic *qarn-, ancestor of Hebrew qeren. But the exact ...


4

The word for empty in Greek appears to be κενό, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ḱen-. The word for dog, κῠ́ων, is from Proto-Indo-European *ḱwṓ. (This would make it cognate with English hound, Latin canis etc.) So there doesn't appear to be any common ancestry between κῠ́ων and κενό. It's not surprising given the lack of semantic connection.


4

The basic meaning of the root *leǵ- was "pick out". Compare e.g., from Latin, se-lect, col-lect: to collect things is to pick them out (legō) and place them together (con-). In Greek, the development seems to have been something like "pick out (information)" > "recount" > "say". If you're telling someone a story, ...


4

The Chinese character 子 appears to derive from a drawing of a baby with arms spread, which has a corresponding word tsa in Sino-Tibetan, pronounced something like tsəʔ in Old Chinese. Greek zeta (Z), lower case ζ, derives from Phoenician zayin, and was phonetically [z]: presumably it derives from a picture of some thing that started with z, but the "...


4

I’ve had some confusion over this too, and in light of all the answers here and the sources for them I think the claim it is an Aeolic form is from one wrong statement in Wikipedia. We would very much expect this not to be an Aeolic form, but possibly an exceptional Ionic form, since the origin is Proto-Greek hikkwos (where q is a labiovelar), and while ...


3

just wanted to share some images One of the first attested uses in an English text: Source: Euclid, Henry Billingsley, John Dee, François De Foix Candale, John Day, and English Printing Collection. The elements of geometrie of the most auncient philosopher Evclide of Megara. Imprinted at London: By Iohn Daye, 1570. Pdf. https://www.loc.gov/item/03020856/. ...


3

Actually, Ξ was imported from the Phoenician alphabet (samekh, probably [s] – Smitic has a plethora of sibilants compared to Greek, so letters could be recycled for other purposes). But Ξ was not used in all dialects. Ψ and Χ were possibly created within Greek. The problem was the need to have some way to denote [pʰ tʰ kʰ ps ks], which could be done with ...


2

Anticipating a professional philologist's answer, I'm just pointing out you got the construction slightly wrong. Ὑπέρ is "beyond", "trans", but normally in a sense of excess, that is "more so", as in "hyperplasia"; not opposition, "so far beyond to effectively negate", or "beyond the reach of", as ...


2

City of lights is modern term i do not think it has any historical reference Paris is often referred to as the 'City of Light' (La Ville Lumière), both because of its leading role during the Age of Enlightenment and more literally because Paris was one of the first large European cities to use gas street lighting on a grand scale on its boulevards and ...


2

Lutetia is more probably from Celtic *luHt- "mud".


1

I'll answer based on my familiarity with Greek from other authors, e.g., Embick, Alexiadou, etc. This is a wh-movement sentence. The PP to which friend was moved from an embedded position as the object of the verb speak into the higher Spec,CP to form a question. VSO here is a derived word order where the verb moves to I but the subject remains in Spec,VP. ...


1

Dov Lerner's article on σαβαχθανι is quite interesting. He argues that this word is a transliteration from the Hebrew סבכתני "you have tangled me up" which may then be a link to the ram in the Sebak (סבך)-tree in Genesis 22:13.


1

As the other replies mention, the suffix here is -ῑ́της -ī́tēs (-ῑ́ται -ī́tai in the nominative plural), a back formation from πολῑ́της polī́tēs "citizen". It's commonly used to translate the Semitic nisbah suffix -ī common in gentilics There is another source of Greek gentilics ending in -ται (less relevant to these specific names), which is from a ...


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