11 votes
Accepted

Is there some equivalent of a "Grimm's law" that applies to the Semitic language family?

Quite a lot of them, in fact! Grimm's Law is probably the most famous description of a regular sound change. But there are an enormous number of these in historical linguistics, some named, some not. ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 65.4k
6 votes

Not affected by Grimm's Law?

The Wiktionary entry for "path" does a terrible job of making this clear, but the reconstructed Germanic form *paþaz is generally thought to be a loanword taken from some other Indo-European ...
brass tacks's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Proto-Indo-European *nepōts cognate in Old English

It sounds like this is meant as a puzzle of some sort. So I'll tell you right away—the information you've given isn't sufficient to know where the stress is. Stress in PIE isn't always predictable, so ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 65.4k
1 vote

Did Grimm's law take effect only 2500 years ago?

Well, by definition, proto-Germanic is the reconstructed ancestor of all attested Germanic languages. Since the Germanic languages are really closely related, and their attestation does not go back ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
1 vote

Not affected by Grimm's Law?

From memory (from reading some book in the past - i'm not that old) I believe it was borrowed from Scythian after Grimm's law had happened and that it was the Scythian word for their royal roads.
Ned's user avatar
  • 606

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