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A language can be both “analytic” and “synthetic”, the two categories are the polar points in the analytic–synthetic spectrum (or call it ‘continuum’) on which you position languages, that's why some languages are more analytic than others, or one can say, for example, that language X is synthetic with a some analytic features, but its related language Y, ...


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"Analytic" and "synthetic" are ends of a continuum regarding morphological versus syntactic means of combining elements, where "more morphology" is on the synthetic end and "more syntax" is on the analytic end. Since a language can use both syntax and morphology to combine elements, and languages do both, a language ...


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Balto-Slavic languages developed their own way to decline adjectives, by combining the nominal forms with the forms of personal pronouns (In Slavic *jъ, ja, je). Many Slavic languages (e.g., Russian) still allow the old nominal declension, but Czech mostly allows only the modern compound declension. Wikipedia calls these short and long https://en.wikipedia....


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The vowel ऋ, used in Sanskrit (संस्कृत), does not survive in modern Indian languages. It is realised as रि (ri) in some parts and रु (ru) in others today. The Roman 'i' is a result of transcription from the former type of language.


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PIE had a rich inflection system, as is echoed in the oldest attested daughter languages. Owing to this, if adjective and noun were each appropriately declined, the order could be either way. As to the actual order, there is not enough evidence to support an absolute trend either way in PIE. Remember that word order is more important in modern Germanic and ...


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I did some amateur research into similarities between Eurasiatic and Australian as well as Trans-New-Guinean. There is some similarity in numerals for one, two, five and ten (ten usually has part meaning "two" and five often means "palm" or "one palm"): Besides this, there is a striking similarity in the words for fire, but ...


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"ri" transcribes a vocalic trilled "r" (apical placement I do not know, I think alveo palatal), also found in "Rig" Vedas, "krshna", etc. as my memory serves me. I think it a bit like "brz" meaning "fast" in Macedonian (?i think), brzo in Serbian (which I learned as "brzıt" pronounced as ...


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