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What are these "unexplained similarities" between Celtic languages and languages from North Africa?

The similarities usually cited between Insular Celtic and the Semitic languages and those of North Africa are the following: VSO as basic word order. "Conjugated" prepositions, where ...
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What are these "unexplained similarities" between Celtic languages and languages from North Africa?

One feature that immediately comes to my mind is the basic word order VSO of Insular Celtic shared with Berber languages of North Africa, Standard Arabic, and Phoenician. Unexplained is a strong word ...
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1 vote

Are there any languages that have a pronoun which is only used to refer to royalty?

朕 and 寡人 are both words used by the emperors in China. 本王 was used for the kings to refer to himself.
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Two questions about language evolution (primarily PIE and proto-nostratic)

First of all, the immediate predecessor of PIE was probably Proto-Indo-Uralic, then something like Proto-Eurasiatic, while Proto-Nostratic is more hypothetical than not. So, we can look at Uralic ...
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3 votes
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Alternative sentence structures in historical languages

I'm interested in what is known about the structure of languages and how much they might differ. In Indo-European languages (and Hebrew as well), the basic sentence structure is (not necessarily in ...
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Two questions about language evolution (primarily PIE and proto-nostratic)

(a) If there were a clear trend from flexive type to analytical type, over the last 100,000 years or so, it would follow that almost all the languages of the world would have evolved to be analytic ...
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2 votes

When were there the most languages?

It is a difficult question, because the population has increased a lot, but on the other hand the number of languages per 10 million people has decreased. So, although it seems clear that in the last ...
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2 votes

Alternative sentence structures in historical languages

It seems likely that “thought” (whatever that is) is different from “expression”, and that language is a system for encoding thoughts into some system of expression. Linguists analyze that system of ...
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1 vote

Alternative sentence structures in historical languages

All possible permutations of Subject, Verb, and Object are attested as the basic word order in at least one language. There are different estimates of the proportions but per the Wikipedia page on ...
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3 votes

How do new dialects emerge?

There are many studies that attempt to quantify the relative weight of such factors: there is a substantial sub-field of linguistics known as quantitative sociolinguistics. For the most part, such ...
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Where is the Slavic homeland, according to linguists, and how do they know that?

Wikipedia seems to have a source for the claim, in this article The Common Slavic words for beech, larch and yew were also borrowed from Germanic, which led Polish botanist Józef Rostafiński to place ...
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