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There is no proof that the Indus valley language was Dravidian at all. Looking only at the geographical distribution of the Dravidian languages, it looks at the first sight that Brahui is an old relic of a formerly existing Dravidian language continuum stretching from the southern tip of India to the border of Pakistan and Iran. However, newer research has ...


4

It is not even established that those symbols represent a language, because statistically they do not "fit" within either syllabary, alphabet or logographic systems. If we aren't even sure they're language, we cannot possibly guess what family language they'd be, although the IVC is sometimes posited to have been migrated south forming the Dravidian cultures,...


4

The answer seems to be no. Asko Parpola, in his chapter on the Indus script in Daniels and Bright's The World's Writing Systems (1996), says: "it has no obvious genetic affinity with any other known script... There is no connection whatsoever with the earliest scripts of historical South Asia, Brahmi and Kharoshthi, which were created on the basis of Semitic ...


1

The previous recommendation of Catford is very good, but it's important for you to understand that the Indus Valley "Script" may not be a script at all but rather a set of markings, seal-emblems, or decorative motifs. The series of articles by Witzel, Sproat and Farmer are extremely instructive - some of them use statistical techniques that may ...


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