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2

In Pashto (Indo-Iranian), the word for ‘blind’ does begin with /ɽ/ and is also written with ‘ڑ’ in some scripts, though most widely accepted scripts use ړ. blind: [ɽʉ̃n] (it's also pronounced with [ɻ])


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It's also a widely-held axiom in linguistics (phonology, specifically) that segments are always syllabified, in all languages. But that is not an empirically well-supported claim. There are certainly a number of languages which provide various kinds of evidence that the syllable can be a thing, just as [ʕ] can be a segment of a language, but not every ...


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It's a widely-held axiom in linguistics that syllabification is never phonemic. In other words, words aren't stored in your brain pre-broken-down into syllables; that syllabification happens later according to regular rules. The reasoning behind this axiom is a bit circular, since it sometimes requires you to finagle your underlying phonemic forms to encode ...


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Since you tagged this "phonology" rather than "phonetics": There are a few different ways of representing the second syllable of words like "mirror" in rhotic dialects. Some people treat it as a combination of a vowel /ə/ and a consonant; other people treat it as a syllabic resonant /ɹ̩/. (The same goes for the second syllable ...


4

If you look at official IPA charts (here, here), you won't find the letter /ɚ/ anymore. Esling's chart (the second of those) exemplifies the rhoticity diacritic on regular schwa (ə plus rhotic-hook, i.e. [ ə˞ ], analogous to [a˞] and so on. All that means is, "whatever the vowel is, plus a rhotic quality", which can be any kind of rhotic ...


1

Between them, Tunny and Danger Fourpence have nicely covered much of Great Britain north of London. Southwest England The Westcountry dialect has the stereotypical retroflex "pirate" R, as demonstrated by Sam in the Lord Of The Rings films (though frankly his accent makes me cringe and sounds to me more like a bad attempt at Irish). Westcountry is,...


2

Phonetisaurus can do that: https://github.com/AdolfVonKleist/Phonetisaurus There is a strict 1-1 correspondence between the 2 rows: c l o s e <eps> K L OW1 Z _ <eps> q u o t e <eps> K W OW1 T _ <eps> Python code: import phonetisaurus model = phonetisaurus.Phonetisaurus ("../../train/model.fst") results = ...


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ɛ is the same vowel as in "red". ðə'trʌkɪz'rɛd is a straight forward transliteration of the sentence "The truck is red".


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Transcriptions of type 2 aim to symbolically record the physical event, and do not have an language-specific interpretation. They are, essentially, "what you hear", and when you first encounter a language and record utterances in the language, you are simply transducing the acoustic waveform into fixed letters. This is the foundation for ...


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It is only the allophonic transcription of that narrowness you chose to give as an example in your question (#3) that totally coincides with the impressionistic narrow transcription (#2). If you choose a lesser degree of narrowness for allophonic transcription (that is, indicating only some features of allophones, not all of them), the very narrow allophonic ...


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An articulatory target is the position at which an active articulator aims to produce a certain sound. As the Handbook itself elucidates with [ɹ] as an example (p. 6), in central fricatives and approximants, the articulators must not make a contact with each other, so an articulatory target does not always coincide with the passive articulator. A passive ...


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