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2

I'm not sure I entirely understand the question, but there are a lot of reasons why in a phonological analysis of English, r-colored vowels might be treated as something other than a vowel + rhotic consonant sequence. In many varieties of American English, when we try to use that kind of analysis, we end up with an unusual set of allowed vowel + /r/ ...


2

The question has a contradictory presupposition: one might care that phonemically-speaking an /ə/ followed by a rhotic consonant in the same syllable has its pronunciation impacted The contradiction arises from limiting this to "phonemically-speaking", but then asks about having "pronunciation impacted". Pronunciation is phonetics, ...


3

I like the answer given by user6726, but want to address some other issues. Generally, any kind of /e/ will be "halfway" between /a/ and /i/ as you divide the "vowel space" into three. To distinguish [ɛ] and [e], you generally have to divide the same space into four, so that [ɛ] will be noticeably closer in sound to /a/ and [e] will be ...


4

The only effective way to produce IPA sounds in a standard manner is to listen to and imitate expert productions. The IPA kindly provides a collection of such recordings, which you can get here. There are a number of knock-offs on the internet if you aren't interested in standard values. As you will notice, there are differences in the productions of the ...


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