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9 votes
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c- in Irish clann "offspring"

You have to a large degree answered the question yourself, really: clann is indeed a very early loan word. Like Common Celtic, Common Insular Celtic had no /p/, but it had /kʷ/. The Brythonic branch ...
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6 votes
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How do you decode the CELT transcriptions?

Most of these aren’t CELT-specific, but commonly used in manuscript editions everywhere. MS is a common English abbreviation for manuscript. The Latin is part of the manuscript. A very large ...
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5 votes
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Are the Irish laws written in the Irish language?

The Constitution is bilingual, and the Irish version take precedence in case of conflict. Some Acts such as the Adoption Act 2010 are passed in English and Irish, but some are English only. Most are ...
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5 votes
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Where did Irish "-acht" come from?

A quick look at Stair na Gaeilge yields this (in Kim McCone’s chapter An tSean-Gaeilge agus a réamhstair — “Old Irish and its prehistory”)… 21.2 … It can be seen that use is made of the suffix *-(i)...
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4 votes
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How are the Ogham stones inscribed?

Since you talk about the "original" Irish people, I'm going to assume you mean the original inventors of the script, who spoke an early Q-Celtic language in the fourth century CE. (Also note that ...
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4 votes
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The current status of Irish Gaelic in Ireland

There's an easy answer which is to check out the wikipedia page on the status of the Irish language. But the following is what I found with and outside the wikipedia article. Linguistic maps of ...
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2 votes

Gaelic Spelling and Pronunciation

The spelling Aodhán reflects the Classical Irish pronunciation of: [e:ðˠɑ:nˠ] This evolved into: [i:ɑ:nˠ] in northern dialects and [e:gˠɑ:nˠ] in southern dialects. In Classical Irish the ...
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2 votes

Gaelic Spelling and Pronunciation

The most common pronunciation would be something along the lines of /e:ɔd̪ˠa:n̪ˠ/ amongst all the Irish speakers I've ever heard or spoken with "as Gaeilge", both Gaelgóirí and second language ...
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2 votes

Three questions regarding the distinctions between certain broad and slender sounds in Irish

I don't exactly understand the question, but it sounds like this is in the real of "I don't get it, what do I do" problems. This database has good word recordings in Connacht, Ulster and Munster Irish,...
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2 votes

The current status of Irish Gaelic in Ireland

I am not certain what the question is, but if it helps, most Irish people start learning the language from the age of 4 or 5 so everyone is familiar with basic phrases, even though few of us speak it ...
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2 votes
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What is considered the smallest possible sample size for word frequency lists used in FL instruction?

What is considered a large enough sample size when being used to guide the creation of pedagogical resources such as foreign language courses and why? How large your corpus should be depends on what ...
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2 votes
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Does loss of conditioning envt automatically create new phonemes?

The answer depends on which definition of "phoneme" you use. Under the classical taxonomic definition, where you analyze actual sounds into a more abstract system, two sounds are allophones if their ...
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2 votes

Three questions regarding the distinctions between certain broad and slender sounds in Irish

I've lived outside Ireland for well over 20 years but have been stuck in the country due to the pandemic. During the past few months, Irish has been on my mind for the first time since I left school, ...
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  • 21
2 votes

Looking for contrastive feature hierarchies for Irish, Manx and/or Scottish Gaelic

It depends on what you mean by "contrastive feature hierarchy". This particular combination of words does refer to an existing theory, promulgated by Elan Dresher, but there are similar ...
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2 votes
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How to convert Old Irish Latin script to Ogham?

It's not clear if you're asking for programming instructions: I'll assume you don't literally want to know "how do I do it". "áras" and "baithis" appear to be OIr words (as you correctly predicted, ...
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1 vote

Three questions regarding the distinctions between certain broad and slender sounds in Irish

The broad/slender contrast is one of (relatively) velarised vs palatalised consonants. Among native speakers, as far as I can tell, the entire consonant is either palatalised or velarised and any ...
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1 vote

IPA for Slender Irish /r'/ in Connemara Dialects

Based on Bhaldraithe's description, I would transcribe it as [d͡ɹ̝̆ʲ] or [d͜ð̠̆ʲ]. One may call it a palatalized alveolar tapped affricate. (This is a narrow transcription. The tie bars and diacritics ...
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1 vote
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Gaelic Spelling and Pronunciation

Firstly, I'll assume that the way your first and last names are written reflect the official written standard, the Caighdeán Oifigiúil. This amounts to a single way of writing Gaeilge (Irish) even ...
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