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16 votes

Is it possible to have a word-based language completely without word inflection?

The problem is, things like "word-based" vs "character-based" as you put it (the standard words are alphabetic vs logographic) apply to writing systems, not languages. Languages, both historically and ...
Draconis's user avatar
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11 votes

difference between Isolating (analytics) vs inflected (fusional) vs agglutinative languages

Just to clarify matters a bit, the OQ seems to have a confusing presupposition, viz Isolating (analytic) vs inflecting (fusional) vs agglutinating languages (it's inflected, btw, not inflexed) ...
jlawler's user avatar
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11 votes

Is it possible to have a word-based language completely without word inflection?

There is no such categorization of languages as "word-based" vs. "character-based". Not all Chinese speakers are literate. Standard Chinese has certainly been affected by the character-based writing ...
brass tacks's user avatar
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7 votes

difference between Isolating (analytics) vs inflected (fusional) vs agglutinative languages

@Eleshar's answer sums it up very well: “Good luck with separating some of the forms into morphemes”. Still, there's one important difference that makes it impossible to draw a straight parallel ...
Be Brave Be Like Ukraine's user avatar
6 votes

Are fusional languages easier to learn than isolating languages?

L1 difficulty It is not at all obvious that it even means anything to say that one language is harder to learn (as L1) than another. If some language were really so hard that children simply didn't ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.1k
6 votes

The difference between isolating and analytic languages?

Sapir (1921) is the more commonly cited source about this issue, and he sets up two typologies Analytic/Synthetic/Polysynthetic: These refer to the degree to which different parts of a sentence are ...
WavesWashSands's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Is there a dominant sequence in which a language throughout its evolution changes its type?

You've hit upon one of the key insights in modern linguistic theory! :D You are partially right in your observations. Humboldt actually made the opposite observation, that an isolating language is ...
WavesWashSands's user avatar
5 votes

difference between Isolating (analytics) vs inflected (fusional) vs agglutinative languages

The main difference according to my understanding is that in inflective languages, one usually declines, or change morphemes (which are closely integrated into the word) to inflect meaning of the word....
xuq01's user avatar
  • 264
4 votes

difference between Isolating (analytics) vs inflected (fusional) vs agglutinative languages

To be honest, this classification comes from 19th century and it is based mostly on verb, occasionally nominal inflections as the primary criterion of comparing languages (and subsequently, also ...
Eleshar's user avatar
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3 votes

Are there highly analytic (isolating) languages without tone?

The best example is probably Khmer. The difficulty is finding an isolating language at all, i.e. a language with absolutely no word-formation processes (where everything is syntax). In many linguistic ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.1k
3 votes

Is it possible to have a word-based language completely without word inflection?

There is a variety of Chinese, Dungan, spoken by Muslims now living in Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan, that is written alphabetically using the Cyrilic script. It is still typologically and genetically ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
2 votes

difference between Isolating (analytics) vs inflected (fusional) vs agglutinative languages

I find that question interesting. I've noticed that in some (?) analytic languages a phrase which consists of -let's say- a preposition, an article and a noun can be just one phonological word. The ...
Apóstolos Papaðimitríu's user avatar
1 vote

How frequent are different morphosyntactic types?

Originally polysynthesis only meant that an average word had a high content of morphems or meaning elements, without any clear definition how high it should be to call a language polysynthetic. Later ...
Knut Holt's user avatar
  • 105
1 vote

How frequent are different morphosyntactic types?

I won't answer this directly but rather give resources that I think can answer it. The WALS (World Atlas of Language Structures) has three chapters and accompanying maps on inflection types, 20, 21, ...
Mitch's user avatar
  • 4,455

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