Hot answers tagged

13

There is a theory, applicable to all human languages, that is even encoded in what certain words mean in linguistics. Namely, "related" is taken to be a claim about genetic (historical) relations between languages. When we say that English and German are related, we mean that they historically derive from a single language. When we say that English and ...


6

The name in English (as used in the media) started as Cambodia, and changed briefly during the 70's and 80's after the fall of the Lon Nol government. The name "Kampuchea" went the way of the Khmer Rouge and Vietnamese governments of the country, and can be seen as making a break with those regimes. English usage reflects French usage, so current "Kingdom of ...


4

There isn't such a theory. For starters, a sprachbund only occurs through contact, and so it's unlikely to have a sprachbund broken up by South or Central Asia. Second of all, the different types of t-like sounds in Arabic (and some varieties of Hebrew) use is not like the varieties of t-like sounds in South East Asian languages. Arabic <ت> and Hebrew &...


4

The symbols the Thai and Khmer scripts share but which are not used in Classical Sanskrit are few. They are these: Consonant: Khmer ឡ [lɑː] and Thai ฬ [ḷa]. This symbol is used in Pali and Vedic Sanskrit words for the sound [ḷ] which does not exist in Classical Sanskrit. These vowel diacritics: Khmer ឹ [ə]/[ɨ] and Thai ◌ึ [ɯ] and their long counterparts; ...


3

In speaking of a comparison of vocabularies between the languages, one may refer to the Swadesh list, which is a commonly used compilation of vocabulary items used for quantifying the relations between two languages. I'll refer you to André-Georges Haudricourt, 1953 for the details, but the paper showed correspondences between Vietnamese and one or more of ...


3

I believe that at the core this is prescriptivism as applied to orthography, though more examples would be needed to derive a definitive conclusion. In your first three examples1, these are official in some way or another: Kolkata and Mumbai were officially changed by India's government to better match local languages, while Beijing is the Hanyu Pinyin ...


1

No, it's not Thai. I'm almost sure the script is Javanese, but it's upside-down in your picture. The language is not necessarily Javanese, because the script is used for several languages; check out the link for more info.


1

Short answer The Thai vowel อู is a high, back, rounded vowel. The corresponding Lao vowel is very similar and for the Khmer one I can’t comment. The first element of the Vietnamese diphthong in mười is the vowel ư, which is a high, central, unrounded vowel. But Vietnamese also has a vowel u, which is like อู is a high back rounded vowel. Interim ...


1

Albeit questions about translation are offtopic on this site, here's the way how to identify the language by yourself. First, note that it is Khmer. In the future, you should always provide with some information where the scan came from. This will help you limit your search. The image is rotated upside-down. Here's the correct orientation: The first line ...


1

Actually, there is no inconsistency in the two Wikipedia articles you gave the links to. The vowels [ɑ], [ŭə], [ŏə], and [ĕə] are written with the help of a special diacritic sign called bântăk (a small vertical line written over the final consonant of a syllable, ់). in a syllable with inherent [ɑː] without any diacritical vowel symbols, bantak shortens ...


1

I don't know (I know nothing about Khmer), but one thing going on here is that the first article is talking about vowel phonemes (it uses slashes), and the second one about is talking about pronunciations (it uses brackets). Phonemes are idealized targets of articulation and need not correspond in an obvious way to actual pronunciations. I think that ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible