7

The usual term is a co-hyponym. Here's a screenshot of Cann 2011: 459


5

Mother is not the antonym of father. They are co-hyponyms because they are both a kind of parent - and parent is the hypernym of mother and father. Antonymy is the relation that holds between parent and child. So by extension the antonym of mother could be said to be child. EDIT: After reading hippietrail's answer, I somewhat changed my opinion. If one ...


5

The key to understanding is the difference between objects and names of objects: A meronom is a part. A meronym is the name of a part. A meronomy is a relationship between parts and sub-parts. Meronymy is a relationship between words. Mereology is the mathematical study of parts and wholes. It cares about mathematical objects, not about words. The kind ...


5

The word for empty in Greek appears to be κενό, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ḱen-. The word for dog, κῠ́ων, is from Proto-Indo-European *ḱwṓ. (This would make it cognate with English hound, Latin canis etc.) So there doesn't appear to be any common ancestry between κῠ́ων and κενό. It's not surprising given the lack of semantic connection.


4

None of them, nor meronym nor hyperonym. Because they are the same word, they share the same meaning. Signified of parent is : idea of parent + idea of singular (zero form) Signified of parents is : idea of parent + idea of plural So, this kind of classification cannot be applied to things that denominate the same thing. That goes also for plurals ...


3

Thanks for your question. This example reflects a larger problem in grammaticizing language. Roughly speaking there are two approaches: Generative and descriptive. A parser is generative, presupposing that there are elementary and globally correct grammar rules whom all sentences in a language ideally abide by. Exceptions are accepted but are treated as “...


3

I think you answered your own question! "but" is used to […] indicate that the first clause is contrastive to the second in a way In your first example, "I am not a teacher" contrasts with "I am a student". In context, I'd imagine something like this: Alice, in a school: Excuse me, are you a teacher? I have some questions about the organization here. ...


3

Sounds like you're referring to words such as "length". Is that what you mean, or are you looking for words that explicitly morphologically consists of a pair of antonyms for that? If the latter is the case, then Mandarin Chinese. The concept of "the degree of which" is commonly formed by pairing up the pair of antonyms. For example: "Magnitude" 大小 ...


3

As pointed out by others, "true synonyms" do not exist. At least not when taking pragmatics into account. If we ignore pragmatics for a moment, we could claim that, e.g., At most five people will come to the party and Less than six people will come to the party are (truth-conditionally) equivalent. In any case, even this example is not uncontroversial. ...


3

I disagree with hippietrail's answer as I have not seen any dictionaries which describe this type of relationship as antonymy. For example: father, père. In Merriam-webster we have descendant as antonym, and in TLFi enfant. As such, I don't think considering these types of words as antonyms is a common point of view. In Semantics (1977, pp. 279—280), John ...


2

I think the word you are looking for is plesionym. See, for example, ftp://ftp.cdf.toronto.edu/pub/gh/Hirst-NearSynonyms-95.pdf.


2

I think that memory is more 'semantic' than 'linguistic', but, yes, we store these categories. The larger sets are 'hypernyms' of the subsets (which are 'hyponyms' of the larger sets). ex: Fido is a puppy. Every puppy is a dog. Every dog is a mammal. Every mammal is an animal. Every mammal is a living thing. (Therefore, Fido is a living thing.)


2

Yes, there are many patterns of conceptual organization evident in language.It shows up in all sorts of psycholinguistic effects such as priming as well as in the way language structures are related to one another. One such pattern is represented in the WordNet dictionary relating synonyms, hyponyms and hypernyms in what they call synsets. There is also a ...


2

There are many in Sanskrit सतासत् n. satAsat true and the false See Monier Williams Sanskrit Dictionary at http://www.spokensanskrit.org/index.php?mode=3&tran_input=satAsat&direct=se Other samAsas or joining words examples like happiness + sorrow = happiness & sorrow सुख | दुक्ख = सुखदुक्ख true+ false = true and false सत्य | असत्य = ...


2

There are zillions of bases for social conflict: race, politics, sexual identity, religion, and "ethnicity", among others. There is some degree of conflict between Hungarians and Slovaks, which is as far as I know just about ethnicity. The most identifiable ethnic feature that says whether you are one vs. the other is language. Language differences ...


1

An out of the blue comparison of two lists of letter-collections (I won't call them words) might well be provided to prove that two writing systems are computationally interchangeable: step one is always to identify what kind of claim is actually being made. The word "connection" should set off an alarm, because it is very difficult to prove that ...


1

First level check: Factually correctness Do the words mean what they are claimed to mean? Are they well-attested and not disputed (The Hebrew Bible contains some hapaxes [words occurring only once] with uncertain meanings)? Check with a dictionary. Do it for both sides of the list. Second level check: Internal etymologies, loan words and borrowed words Loan ...


1

I would say a meronym. The rule of thumb for a hyponym is, "is every X a Y? is not every Y an X?" For example, every cat is an animal, but not every animal is a cat, so cat is a hyponym of animal. In this case, is every parent a parents? Is not every parents a parent? The answer, if we overlook the strange syntax, would have to be no. So it's probably not ...


1

Your intuition is correct, the parser is wrong in this case. Note that the argument structure for "lassen" taking an open complement is lassen⟨_,_,P⟨...⟩⟩ where P is the secondary predicator. This means that in a sentence like "er ließ sie ermorden" the causee depends on the finite verb. Reflexivisation unifies the subject with the argument in object ...


1

I think what you need is WordNet. This is a huge lexical database and it contains a lot words which are related in many different ways: hyperonymy, hyponymy, meronymy, antonymy, etc. For more on WordNet, you can visit their website, read the papers, or just use their online browser to get a better feeling of what it does and what can you get from it. There ...


1

I would say that it is wrong to say that when we hear the word puppy, we think of the concept of dogs and then we think of the concept animal. That suggests a simple stimulus-response model of word recognition which I would say is wrong. Let's suppose that we have successfully heard "puppy" (not "guppy", "puffy", "putty"), then we can access whatever / ...


1

"Kingdom" a higher taxonomic level, higher than "phylum". You can probably say "superlevel", if you desperately need it in one word, but I would rather say "higher level in the hierarchy/taxonomy/classification".


1

Yes they are antonyms. That doesn't affect whether they may have other, possibly even overlapping or seemingly contradictory relationships, such as being co-hyponyms. Antonyms are two words which are opposites. That seems pretty simple. But in fact you have to think about what "opposite" means, and what it means for words in particular. In the end it comes ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible