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I can give you a grammatical characterization of Tibetan so then you can compare its features with the other two languages and progress your research about typology. Tibetan is a particular language with some relatively weird grammatical elements. Its lexical dimension: As in Chinese and Burmese the basic words are mostly monosyllables and the creation of ...


5

In Latin, when part of a constituent "jumps over" an intervening word or phrase, as in your example, this is called hyperbaton. It is common in poetry, nor rare in rhetorical prose. It is considered to be a figure of speech, so it is supposed to have stylistic qualities; it is not the normal word order. In poetry, hyperbaton is also often used ...


4

In many languages, for example Bengali, the word comparable to if is optional and frequently absent, whereas the word marking the apodosis (usually with a similar function to then) is mandatory, exactly the opposite way round to English. Of course, it's dubious whether then has an inherent connection with conditionals in English.


2

A language can be both “analytic” and “synthetic”, the two categories are the polar points in the analytic–synthetic spectrum (or call it ‘continuum’) on which you position languages, that's why some languages are more analytic than others, or one can say, for example, that language X is synthetic with a some analytic features, but its related language Y, ...


2

"Analytic" and "synthetic" are ends of a continuum regarding morphological versus syntactic means of combining elements, where "more morphology" is on the synthetic end and "more syntax" is on the analytic end. Since a language can use both syntax and morphology to combine elements, and languages do both, a language ...


2

As for the order of things: "In conditional statements, the conditional clause precedes the conclusion as the normal order in all languages. (...) (Greenberg 1963: 84, #14) (https://typo.uni-konstanz.de/raraneu/universals-archive/501/) As for the question if there are words for "if", "then" and "else" in all languages: No ...


2

The question that exists in phonological theory regarding syllables, moras and so forth is, what is the required collection of suprasegmental units required to describe human language phonological grammars. Practically speaking, this means, "do we need all of the set {skeletal position, mora, onset, rhyme, nucleus, coda, margin, syllable}?" The ...


1

This has not been done. There is a basic informational limit on what questions you can ask – you cannot get frequency of use data for phonemes for most languages of the world. Indeed, getting reliable phoneme lists for most languages is challenging. You can get information for some languages (English, Spanish, Chinese...) but not Tiriki. However, there are ...


1

For frequency information on German, I highly recommend the Leipzig Wortschatz portal (here already querying for rot "red". It is based on contemporary newspaper texts and also has corpora for many other languages, including English.


1

Cohn 1990 in her UCLA dissertation (Phonetic and Phonological Rules of Nasalization) compares English, Sundanese and French w.r.t. airflow. Nasal airflow during vowel production in these languages are (1) entirely predictable from local physical context, "partial" and quite gradient, (2) the result of an abstract rule and (3) underlying as well as ...


1

"Attribute" and "predicate", when used in the same context, generally refer to two different syntactic ways of applying modifiers to a noun. "The white cat" is an attribute, while "the cat is white" is a predicate. (In English, predicative modifiers tend to look like the objects of verbs, but other languages often show ...


1

In (Middle) Egyptian, the same interrogative is used for animate and inanimate referents: ptr (earlier pw tr, later pty). It's possible, of course, that there were different vocalizations for the "who" and "what" meanings. But if so, we might expect different determinatives to distinguish them, and we don't see that; the determinative is ...


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