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A language can be both “analytic” and “synthetic”, the two categories are the polar points in the analytic–synthetic spectrum (or call it ‘continuum’) on which you position languages, that's why some languages are more analytic than others, or one can say, for example, that language X is synthetic with a some analytic features, but its related language Y, ...


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"Analytic" and "synthetic" are ends of a continuum regarding morphological versus syntactic means of combining elements, where "more morphology" is on the synthetic end and "more syntax" is on the analytic end. Since a language can use both syntax and morphology to combine elements, and languages do both, a language ...


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