Hot answers tagged

5

First, it is important to be clear on what "most basic form" as described above covers. One notion is "structurally simplest", that is, "having the fewest added things". The other is "phonologically best for predicting other variants". Mixtec seems to qualify as an example of the future being "most basic" because (a) the future has no prefixes or suffixes, (...


4

This originates in linguistics with Trubetzkoy, who spoke of distinctive "marks" (in the sense of "indication"). -s is a "mark" of plurality, also d has a "mark" of voicing. You may be interested in the recent volume Beyond Markedness in Formal Phonology. Subsequent developments of the theory equated "unmarked" with "common, natural", and thereby expanded ...


2

Probably this confusion is familiar within Indo-European linguistics. If we use the concept 'root' instead of 'base' we will understand this issue more accurately. In Indo-European languages, as far as I know, there is this notion of a root as a lexical entity: Root{reason}, can form: reasoning, reasonable, etc. In other languages with non-concatenative ...


2

Oneida seems to attach different possessive prefixes to the head noun based on the gender of the possessor. The following forms are found in a portion of the table "Possessive prefixes" on page 152 of "Oneida Teaching Grammar", by Clifford Abbott: English a-stems c-stems o/u stems i-stems his lao- lao- lao- lao her ao- ao- ao- ao her ...


1

You could say that in Proto-indoeuropean this might have been the case and there are indications of this in some later languages like Ancient Greek, however this is definitely debatable given the complex morphology and non-trivial rules of ablaut in PIE verbs, so take it more like "it is possible", rather than "PIE did this in a consistent manner". We ...


1

Note: I don't know any Coptic. -rep- and -p- both share the element [p]. Coptic is supposed to have have a prefixed definite article with the consonant [p] for masculine nouns. This suggests to me that -rep- is not a single morpheme, but is further subdivisible. "pai" seems to mean "that". You could look at whether equivalently ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible