17 votes

Can we conclude that morpheme is ALWAYS greater than syllable?

In English, one counterexample is the very common '-ed’ (often /d/) ending: ‘filled’ is 1 syllable, and the morphemes are ‘fill’ + ‘-ed’ (/d/).
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11 votes
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What exactly a morpheme is

The most important fact about "morpheme" is that it is a claim about the state of a language as it exists at a specific time; it is a concept of synchronic analysis, not diachronic analysis (etymology)...
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9 votes

Examples of words that are monomorphemic in English, but polymorphemic in other languages

As I understand your interest, you don't need the relationship to be English (monomorphemic) to Other (polymorphemic), it works just as well if you have English being the polymorphemic example and ...
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8 votes

Examples of words that are monomorphemic in English, but polymorphemic in other languages

One easy source for this is words that used to be polymorphemic, but fossilized by the time they reached English. For example, "desire", "depend", "destroy", "descend", and "delete" are irreducible ...
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8 votes

Examples of words that are monomorphemic in English, but polymorphemic in other languages

An example that springs to mind: English "love" vs. Danish "kærlighed", which is actually tri-morphemic, consisting of "kær" (dear), "-lig" (derivational morpheme creating adjectives, thus "kærlig" = "...
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  • 537
7 votes
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Why is it problematic to assume a null morpheme signifying the singular number of nouns in German?

In short, assuming invisible stuff is always problematic from a theoretical point of view, because you can never really prove it's there, and even worse, you can never really prove it's not there - ...
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6 votes

Is a full stop a morpheme?

Morphemes are sequences of phonemes that have meaning. A full stop or period doesn’t correspond to any sequence of phonemes; so it’s not a representation of a morpheme. It is however related to ...
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6 votes
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Is longish an inflected form of long or a lexeme?

This really comes down to how you define derivation versus inflection. The line between these two categories tends to be incredibly fuzzy and difficult to determine. For instance, if your definition ...
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6 votes
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Question about the concept of free morpheme

A lot of modern linguists use the concept of "free morpheme," which refers to morphemes that can occur as words on their own, as opposed to "bound morphemes," which can only occur in words that have ...
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5 votes

Are all morphemes meaningful?

No, there are a small class of morphemes called interfixes which are needed for phonological reasons, but are not considered to carry any semantic content. One example is the i in humaniform.
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5 votes

Across agglutinative languages are there tendencies for morphemes to occur in certain orders?

I think one of the first major studies was Bybee (1985). Bybee, J.L. 1985. Morphology: A study of the relation between meaning and form. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company. She proposed ...
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4 votes

Why is recognition based on phonemes and not syllables or morphemes?

Assuming the goal of writing a speech recognition program that does what the human mind does, a large non-linguistic front end must be dealt with first (a front end that is decidedly not part of ...
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4 votes

What exactly a morpheme is

You are right that historically, those words are made up from separate units. Morpheme could be used in a historical sense; but it is usually used synchronically. In present day English, compute does ...
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4 votes

Can we conclude that morpheme is ALWAYS greater than syllable?

It is perfectly possible to have three morphemes in one syllable. Consider the word sixths which is comprised of the morphemes /sɪks/, /θ/, and /s/. So we can easily prove that many syllables ...
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4 votes
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What is the morpheme that marks a question called?

Most often it is called an interrogative {particle/prefix/suffix}. There's no intrinsic reason for using the 25-cent word "interrogative" rather than "question", but "interrogative" is a fancy-...
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3 votes

Are all complex words polymorphemic?

I presume you are talking about Complex vs Compound words. A complex word consists of a stem and an affix which the affix does not have any meanings alone. A compound word on the other hand has an ...
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3 votes

Are there any words, morphemes, or particles in any Chinese / Sinitic languages or dialects which don't have a set Hanzi character?

I think it is safe to say that if the language remain alive long enough, it'd be a matter of time until a character is fitted to a spoken word. Even if it didn't originally start with one (i.e., ...
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3 votes

Are all morphemes meaningful?

Traditionally, a morpheme is defined as the minimal meaningful unit of language. Under this assumption, every morpheme is meaningful by defnition. However, this is not always that simple. The ...
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3 votes

Are all morphemes meaningful?

Well it depends on how you define "morpheme". Usually, it's defined as a sign, i.e. a form-meaning correspondence. In this case, the answer is "yes" by definition (and the -i- in humaniform is not a ...
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3 votes

Can we conclude that morpheme is ALWAYS greater than syllable?

We can prove existentially that the shortest morpheme is a single consonant, Examples from Levantine Arabic: -ʃ "verbal negation"; -t "1sg perfective". In Gurage, single phonological features are ...
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3 votes

How is the word 'second' phonologically split into syllables?

Syllable division isn't an evident phonetic fact: people disagree about where it falls (and have for quite a long time). Most arguments about this topic depend critically on which theoretical ...
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2 votes

Can we conclude that morpheme is ALWAYS greater than syllable?

While many others have pointed out that there are many cases where multiple morphemes can exist in one syllable, it is also possible to have morphemes which in themselves do not constitute a syllable: ...
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2 votes

Does adding the suffix -ly to a noun or an adjective provide morphological evidence for word class?

Since -ly can be affixed to nouns (gentlemanly, friendly, ghostly, spritely) and adjectives (unlikely, quickly, heavily, lightly), but not to verbs, then it isn't much use as a diagnostic of word ...
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2 votes

Can we conclude that morpheme is ALWAYS greater than syllable?

In Spanish, the word "era" (was) can take no syllables, for example: Adorarte para mi era obsesión The part "mi era obsesión", when transcribed in IPA, would become /mi̯e.ɾao̯b.se.sjon/, wherein ...
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2 votes

About allomorphs of morphemes

It is by definition meaningless (contains a false presupposition). A morpheme is an abstraction ranging over a particular set of surface strings having certain properties of form and meaning. An ...
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2 votes
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Are there any words, morphemes, or particles in any Chinese / Sinitic languages or dialects which don't have a set Hanzi character?

Certainly. Here is one of many LanguageLog posts on the topic, showing two signs which use respectively the Japanese kana の and the bopomofo symbol ㄟ, in both cases to represent a Taiwanese ...
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  • 6,279
2 votes

Across agglutinative languages are there tendencies for morphemes to occur in certain orders?

Not to refute tendencies in morpheme ordering, but for a different take on your question, this paper discusses how ordering can be compositionally driven by scope, based on data from a very ...
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2 votes

verbal or adjectival suffix -ed in the word "excited"

I think "excited" is definitely an adjective in the first sentence, and most likely an adjective in both sentences. It looks like some people have argued that it must be a verb in the second because ...
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2 votes
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Is a full stop a morpheme?

The first answer I drafted was similar to what boiko ended up writing, but I abandoned it on realizing what you've confirmed by your comment: you're not asking about the linguistic status of the ...
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2 votes

Evidence proving lingustic perception of speech in brain?

There won't be evidence that speech is perceived linguistically, since that is not a sufficiently precise claim that it could be tested experimentally. Since it is self-evident that people do perceive ...
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