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4

Yes and No You're mostly talking to people who are actively trying to be helpful, contributing time to answer linguistics problems as clearly as possible. These people you're talking to use technical words (phoneme, labial, &c) but they do so precisely, using the apt phrase, glossing it and providing links as necessary. Their main answer will just be &...


0

Linear A by David Packard (1974) is quite thorough if slightly dated, inc. sections for morphology and phonology https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=vax3kwoscWQC&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false . Another great resource is the one described in https://sigla.phis.me/paper.pdf and includes a searchable corpus of Linear A texts at https://...


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To respond to a few of your specific points: For instance you don't really charge a battery. Battery is full of charges so is everything else. Electrons don't really flow through wires like water through a pipe, etc. But in everyday use, most people don't need to care that the battery is already full of charges and you're actually just separating them out. ...


1

There is such thing as meta level. Greek μετα- means ‘after, behind’. The easiest way to think about it is by naming it ‘thing about thing’. For example, metadata is “data about data” — a photo in your phone is data, but in it there's metadata, data about the photo — when the photo was taken, its size, the exposition time, etc. So data about data is metadata,...


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No, you do not have a point, because (good) science does use words accurately and unambiguously. But it is probably true that they don't use the words that you would prefer, or assign the definitions that you would prefer. I suspect that you would not get it if I tried to teach you about phonology, because I use a number of special words and specially-...


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