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16 votes

Why do some languages lack family name markers?

The use of grammaticalized family-name markers as in the Slavic etc. cases is relatively infrequent, so the better question is, why or how do such constructions arise in some languages? The ordinary ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.2k
12 votes

Why do some languages lack family name markers?

First of all, family names are far from being universal. In many places of the world they are pretty recent introductions. The existence of family names is also not determined by linguistic factors (...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
11 votes

Origin of Present Perfect in Romance Languages

The similarity is due to a common pathway of grammaticalistion. The have + past participle form comes from a resultative construction (Bybee, Perkins and Pagliuca, 1994), which commonly leads to the ...
WavesWashSands's user avatar
9 votes

Origin of Present Perfect in Romance Languages

To the excellent answer by @WavesWashSands I'll only add that some Latin verbs employed a perfective construction with the verb esse "to be" and a participle, which at some point could have motivated ...
pablodf76's user avatar
  • 1,235
5 votes
Accepted

Where can I find a list of pronunciation rules for different languages?

eSpeak, or its more current fork eSpeakNG, are formant-based speech synthesizers that cover a decently large number of languages, although not all with the same quality. Their grapheme-to-phoneme ...
LjL's user avatar
  • 1,847
4 votes

Morphology: Machine-Learning

It's one of many kinds of compounds, and is not even exocentric (its head is "learning"). As it happens, it is exactly parallel to "machine stitching" (recorded in COHA in 1917) and "book learning" (...
Colin Fine's user avatar
  • 7,464
4 votes

Constructions like the double accusative outside of the Ancient Greek word "διδασκειν"

Latin is full of these: Illum meum amicum appelo. (I call him my friend) Romulum regem romanum fecerun. (They made Romulus into a king) This is with verbs of change (somebody changed/made into ...
Eleshar's user avatar
  • 2,363
4 votes

Where can I find a list of pronunciation rules for different languages?

If you mean literally all "rules of pronunciation", you are extremely out of luck. That's a call for "knowledge of all phonological and phonetic systems of all languages", which we don't have, not ...
user6726's user avatar
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3 votes
Accepted

What's the difference between a light noun and a nominalizer?

The terminology is most commonly used in Sino-Tibetan, Japanese and Korean contexts. I suggest taking a look at this (warning: gigantic volume, probably a good idea to find an electronic version if ...
WavesWashSands's user avatar
3 votes

Constructions like the double accusative outside of the Ancient Greek word "διδασκειν"

The first example that comes to my mind is the dative shift in English, i.e. the construction found in the following sentence: I gave John a book. Both arguments are NPs (rather than PPs), so ...
Artemij Keidan's user avatar
3 votes

"used to" for past habitual: analysis

Preliminary point: The verb-form is the single word "used", not *"used to". Take your example: My car used [to malfunction a lot]. The bracketed sequence is a non-finite clause acting as complement ...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 857
3 votes

are words more independent from syntax in non-analytical languages? Does this affect language processing?

Though there is no clear measure for linguistic independence, I'd be tempted to say no to your question: "are words more independent from syntax in non-analytical languages?". Analytical languages ...
Lefty G Balogh's user avatar
3 votes

Are there right-branching agglutinative languages?

Elamite is agglutinative and (mainly) right-branching, though quotative phrases are left branching. https://archive.org/stream/TheElamiteLanguage1969/Reiner1969TheElamiteLanguagetext#page/n15/mode/...
fdb's user avatar
  • 24.3k
2 votes

"Ought" omission of "to"

In present-day English ought may behave like a 'modal' verb, taking an unmarked infinitive, only in negatives and questions, not in ordinary declaratives: Ought I take that seriously? You ought ...
StoneyB on hiatus's user avatar
2 votes

How do various frameworks account for situations when multiple cases can be assigned?

“‘Me and her’ meets ‘he and I’: Case, person, and linear ordering in English coordinated pronouns”, by Thomas Grano (2006) seems relevant. Grano says The puzzling distribution of case in English ...
brass tacks's user avatar
  • 18.3k
2 votes

"used to" for past habitual: analysis

I don't see why this should be an adverb phrase. Of course, the construction is highly conventionalised, probably even lexicalised and no longer productive (you probably couldn't say My car uses to ...
Natalie Clarius's user avatar
2 votes

Corpus Linguistics: Is it possible to add a tag for "sentence ending"?

I'd say if you are trying to limit yourself to noun phrases, you are probably better off with "because of NP". I'd suggest you use the following in the search bar, and limit yourself based on the ...
Lefty G Balogh's user avatar
2 votes

Terminology: types of inflection and features

Geert Booij defines inherent inflection as “inflection of a word that is not required by its syntactic context” whereas by contextual inflection he understands “inflection that is required by the ...
Alex B.'s user avatar
  • 8,744
2 votes

Where can I find a list of pronunciation rules for different languages?

Basically, the variations in pronunciations of the written letters based on the context. There are two separate steps here. The first is going from the orthography (written language) to the ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 67.1k
2 votes

Is there a database of literal linguistic glosses across languages or per language?

It's not clear what you are looking for (alternatively, your expectation is unrealistic). Drawing on the Cree example, you can locate the gloss "2-like-DIR?-N thus:CNJ-speak.Cree-...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.2k
2 votes

Where can I find a list of pronunciation rules for different languages?

Wikipedia articles titled "[language name] orthography" or "[language name] alphabet" typically have a list of grapheme-to-phoneme correspondences. A site called Omniglot also has summaries of ...
Nardog's user avatar
  • 4,951
2 votes

In English, is the use of the -ing participle verb form as adjectives or subjects or objects an example of conversion (a.k.a. zero-derivation)?

None of your examples has a present participle. All the examples have gerunds or, in other words, Poss-ing nominalizations: a sentence with the verb "bake" has been converted into a noun phrase. ...
Greg Lee's user avatar
  • 12.5k
2 votes

Case in German Nouns

Well, nouns in German do show case. In particular Mann shows case and declines as such: sing plur nom Mann Männer acc Mann Männer dat Mann(e) Männern gen Mann(e)s Männer The ...
Zorf's user avatar
  • 320
2 votes

How does one write out possessive pronouns under DP

Yes, you could do that. Distributed Morphology (Halle & Marantz 1993) is a morphology framework in which you would have an abstract "they" and "'s" (in your case) which would ...
purlupar's user avatar
  • 648
2 votes
Accepted

For English, is there a finite set of patterns for constructing sentences?

In one interpretation of the concept "pattern", there are infinitely many patterns. Some example of "patterns": [det N aux V det N], [det adj N aux V det N], [det N aux V det adj N]...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.2k
2 votes

For English, is there a finite set of patterns for constructing sentences?

Well, yes, it is finite. It would only rise to infinite if you have a sentence with infinitely many words. And Computational Linguistics is an entire field based around going off of viable patterns in ...
Zoey's user avatar
  • 187
2 votes
Accepted

Does Morpho-syntax = Grammar?

Linguistics is a notoriously divided field and it's unsurprising if people do not agree on these terms (and grammar can be a particularly loose term -- I think lemontree gets at that in the answer you ...
Robin's user avatar
  • 187
2 votes
Accepted

Why did the Rebracketing from "Napron" to "Apron" Figuratively Stick?

The commenters are right that in linguistics it's often hard to say why exactly, but they're wrong to pretend there are no factors that influence the probability of rebracketing and reanalysis in ...
Adam Bittlingmayer's user avatar
1 vote

In English, is the use of the -ing participle verb form as adjectives or subjects or objects an example of conversion (a.k.a. zero-derivation)?

I'm not a linguist, so please forgive any apparent presumption on my part in venturing an answer here. I'm confident about what I'm saying but more interested in the discussion of this answer with ...
Ubu English's user avatar
1 vote

Is there a database of literal linguistic glosses across languages or per language?

Not linguistics glosses, but a lot of sentences in a lot of languages can be found on Tatoeba. The sentences are typically of the phrase-book type, but there are also some more complicated sentences.
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar

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