5 votes

Why two appearances of the past participle "ganado" in this derivation?

One of the main reasons for positing a v layer separate from V is the behavior of ditransitive verbs. In particular, all the objects of a ditransitive verb seem to form a constituent of their own, ...
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5 votes

How do contractions work in syntactic movement?

I'm not convinced the notion "clitic" is really needful to explain what is going on. Some syntactic rules depend on what the words are, and you can't always trust traditional English orthography to ...
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  • 12.3k
5 votes

How do contractions work in syntactic movement?

Summarizing the paper by Zwicky and Pullum commented by @sumelic above: They suggest that most contractions are clitics, but <-n't> is an inflection. Most English contractions, such as <-'s> &...
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  • 6,754
5 votes
Accepted

Question on move operation

First, let me get the usual caveats out of the way: MP is a program, not a theory. It tells you what kinds of questions to ask about syntax, and guides you in comparing the answers from competing ...
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  • 2,585
4 votes

Can a TG generate sentences which a CFG cannot generate?

A transformational grammar G is a tuple (P,T) where P is some context-sensitive (e.g. context free) grammar (the 'base component' of G) and T is a finite sequence of transformations over the alphabet ...
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  • 3,078
4 votes
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Why do 'wonder' and 'think' act differently in wh-movement?

Wonder takes an embedded interrogative complement with its own internal trace: You wonder who John saw t. You wonder who t saw John. You wonder why I left t. When you front that wh- you're ...
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3 votes
Accepted

Is v-spec Specific for agent? If so, How to Solve This Problem?

Andrew Radford (Radford 2004) discusses it on p. 351. Go is an unaccusative verb, which means, under Radford's analysis, that the subject originates in spec-VP, unlike in the case of transitive (...
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  • 8,394
3 votes

X-bar theory without movement

You might want to have a look at LFG, they use X' Theory extended with an additional "lexocentric" category S to accommodate nonconfigurational phrase structures.
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  • 2,469
3 votes
Accepted

Restrictions on Wh-movement

Successive cyclic wh-movement is motivated by theoretical principles of minimal computation, as well as empirical data. There's nothing inherently wrong with the 'one fell swoop' analysis, but cyclic ...
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  • 336
3 votes

Is 'raising' an outdated concept in modern linguistics?

No, Raising is alive and well, but the conception of Raising as a transformation is moribund, because transformations are no longer accepted. So, if we believe in Raising, and Raising is a ...
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  • 12.3k
3 votes

V to T movement in German

du Schach gespielt hast as you say is an embedded clause, and string-identical to the underlying form Carnie is referring to. (To answer your first question.) As for the question on how to detect V-&...
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  • 638
2 votes
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Difference between the Merge postion and the base position

Generative theories of syntax generally propose a few different "operations", which are invoked in various ways to build the tree. If you're a computationalist, you might prefer to call ...
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  • 50.9k
2 votes

Do any languages treat "locative" words as more than suffixes or prepositions?

You used nouns with locative meaning in your own examples: “top” and “side”. In English, nouns like these are used along with prepositions (“on (the) top of”, “on the side of”) but there are languages ...
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  • 16.5k
2 votes

Is Affix Hopping Still a Thing?

Chomsky’s original formulation is obsolete, if only because lexical integrity of some sort is usually assumed. But there are many languages in which suffixes or clitics are part of a constituent that ...
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  • 2,469
2 votes

Wh-movement Question

The original sentence for the question “Which canvas appears to have been painted with a red paint?” is “This/That canvas appears to have been painted with a red paint”, and the answer would be “This ...
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2 votes
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What would English sound like if the Normans were Spanish?

Assuming that those Scandinavians from Normandy in France were speakers of Spanish and not French, also that the invasion was still in 1066, English would sound more or less the same except that some ...
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  • 66.5k
2 votes

Does a null-subject language always have to satisfy EPP?

No. Not in the Turkish that is spoken in Istanbul. The evidence comes from scope relations when the subject is not dropped. When you say: Bütün çocuk-lar gel-me-di. all kid-pl come-neg-pst ...
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1 vote

Do any languages treat "locative" words as more than suffixes or prepositions?

Sure, in the Bantu languages these relationships are generally expressed through nouns rather than prepositions. (Though they're not called relational nouns like the ones brass tacks mentions, for ...
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1 vote
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Floating quantifiers in X-bar theory: "the men all have gone"

'The men all have a {noun}' is fine, but 'the men all have {verb}ed' is not. The rule is probably the same one as the one that has us say 'they/we have all {verbed}' rather than 'they/we all have {...
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1 vote

Allowed surface locations of [+wh] phrases apparently depend on semantics—if so, how and why?

I think you have to be more careful with the examples you're using here. Your parallelism seems odd (at least to me). There are issues of transformation (passivization), surface PP order, and argument ...
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  • 1,028
1 vote

Does a null-subject language always have to satisfy EPP?

EPP entails that [Spec; TP] must be filled. However, the subject can move out from [Spec; TP] to an adjunct position, leaving a trace at [Spec; TP]. An example of such a movement is topicalization, ...
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1 vote

What is the difference between successive-cyclic wh-movement and long-distance wh-movement?

Well, compare TG ( Transformational Grammar) and GPSG (Generalized Phrase Structure Grammar). TG allows the formulation of rules that perform long distance movement, using the variables of a ...
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1 vote

What languages have extraction markers?

As I understand it, you're asking about a specific extraction marker that occurs always and only when a nominal is extracted, and in clause chains it appears in each clause. As far as I know, this ...
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1 vote

X-bar theory without movement

To my mind, the canonical "generative but non-derivational" work is the stuff that Michael Brody did. Have a look at his book Lexico-Logical Form, which is a great and detailed exploration of an ...
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  • 431
1 vote
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On the Analysis of Tough-Movement

Lasnik & Fiengo (1974) "Complement Object Deletion" (section 2) argue against Tough Movement, and Chomsky (1977) "On WH-Movement" p. 102 adopts the base-generated analysis and accepts the ...
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  • 66.5k
1 vote

What is A-movement ? Can I find a short essay that can explain it?

See here for the distinction between A-movement and A'-movement (=A-bar-movement). In short, A-movement moves syntactic objects (words, phrases) into positions where grammatical functions can be ...
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  • 1,404
1 vote
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Head to head movement

Your question seems to presuppose the framework of minimalist syntax as it has been practiced in the last 20 years, so my answer is in this framework as well. In this framework, categories like N, D ...
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