28 votes
Accepted

Are the vast majority of Ukrainians more proficient in Russian than Ukrainian?

After researching this a bit, I'm posting an answer to my own question, but I want to say that I welcome more answers, especially if they bring other pieces of evidence. A 2008 Gallup poll asked ...
MWB's user avatar
  • 1,124
16 votes

Introducing 1 more language to a trilingual baby at home

I suppose you mean television cartoons, not comics (unless this child can read at age 2). This raises a question (potentially askable on a different SE) whether planting a child in front of the ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.1k
12 votes

Are the vast majority of Ukrainians more proficient in Russian than Ukrainian?

Looking at this from a software developer's perspective, there's a significant factor here that you may have overlooked. Translating a program or a website is a significant amount of work, testing, ...
bta's user avatar
  • 221
9 votes
Accepted

How similar are phonemes across different languages?

The term "phoneme" is used in a lot of ways. Most often, people use it to refer to the distribution of "phones" in a given language, where a "phone" is a set of sounds that can be (reliably) ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.1k
8 votes

Are the vast majority of Ukrainians more proficient in Russian than Ukrainian?

The answer is certainly no. We cannot say that this is true for the "vast" majority (say 80%), but maybe this is 50/50. In the south and east, people speak better russian due to their roots (...
Gospadi's user avatar
  • 81
8 votes

Introducing 1 more language to a trilingual baby at home

I have seen success at this with a puppet. In short, you want to introduce a new person to keep the correspondence 1 person = 1 language. A nanny (as pointed by @user6726 ) would be the most ...
Trylks's user avatar
  • 181
7 votes

Do multilinguals have one language they predominantly think in?

I have a single native language (Russian) and have learned English. I can say that I occasionally think either in Russian or English even though I have never lived in English-speakling environment. ...
Anixx's user avatar
  • 6,643
7 votes
Accepted

Selective fluency - is it a thing?

One of my MA instructors, Alex Ho-Cheung Leung, has researched this question with regard to phonology. He says that speakers of 'heritage languages' (e.g. spoken within the family but in the wider ...
mango's user avatar
  • 252
5 votes

Introducing 1 more language to a trilingual baby at home

You've already extended from "1 person = 1 language" to the more general "1 context = 1 language" principle when you added "all together = English". Now you've moved to ...
Stephen Steel's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Term for conversation where each person speaks a different language, while understanding each other

One standard term is receptive multilingualism, which can be via the oral medium or the written medium (or of course, both). One definition: This particular description fits the person who ...
Michaelyus's user avatar
  • 7,466
5 votes

Do multilinguals have one language they predominantly think in?

Me, I am bilingual with English and Norwegian, and I master/have mastered some other languages as well. I'll have some thoughts in English, some in Norwegian or something else, and sometimes in a ...
Omar and Lorraine's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

I don't know what my L1 is and want to find out

You have to first determine how you are going to define "L1", which isn't a scientific term in linguistics. It sort of stands for "first language", in which case Russian is your L1. Though perhaps ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.1k
3 votes

I don't know what my L1 is and want to find out

How is "L1" used in these texts you're reading? Is it a) about the influence of the L1 on the syntax and pronunciation of the L2? b) is it just about the L2 label for a new adult learned language? ...
Mitch's user avatar
  • 4,455
2 votes

Do multilinguals have one language they predominantly think in?

These answers deal with the parts of our thoughts that take place in language, and yes, that is largely context dependent, as others have outlined. That is to say, if you're thinking about best way ...
Some_Guy's user avatar
  • 266
2 votes

Do multilinguals have one language they predominantly think in?

Many people I know who are otherwise perfectly multilingual have strong preferences for memorizing e.g. phone numbers in one of their languages, and find it much more difficult to do so in their other ...
microtherion's user avatar
2 votes

How similar are phonemes across different languages?

There are some issues first, and then I’ll hazard an answer.I think you need definitions for what ‘how similar’ and ‘how close’ mean. For /p/ and /b/, if you’re going by the kinds of phonemic features ...
Jeremy Needle's user avatar
2 votes

Can learning a lot of languages hurt your native language communication skills?

An often mentioned anecdote supporting the answer "yes, it can" is Joseph Conrad's report that he had lost some facility with his native Polish (as a result of becoming a great master of English prose)...
Greg Lee's user avatar
  • 12.5k
2 votes

Can word embeddings between any two languages be transformed in a linear way?

This is really a neat question, and I enjoyed considering it while reading the paper. Recall that word embeddings are a form of manifold learning. As such, this method presumes that communications ...
TheLoneDeranger's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

Frequent use of the pronoun "We" in "I" stead

In English this is commonly called the royal we, or nosism more formally. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_we https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nosism
K--'s user avatar
  • 952
1 vote

Which papers exemplify the attrition of the L1 in the interface of language modules?

There is a huge amount of information out there, the problem is deciding what specific information you are looking for. For example, you could focus on indigenous (Amerindian) language attrition in ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.1k
1 vote
Accepted

Polyglot Fluency Debunkers

Nothing whatsoever fits that description. An expression like "jump the shark" is not just too English-centric to translate into another language, it is obscure slang that I didn't even know ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.1k
1 vote

Do natively bilingual people have accents in one or both of their languages?

Anecdotally, no (but research does concur with my account, for example the Handbook of Bilingualism has many relevant chapters). I have been raised a native Hindi and English speaker from birth, and ...
Aryaman's user avatar
  • 1,134
1 vote

Svelte as a product name, are there any similar sounding negative words in other languages?

A couple more languages come to mind offhand: Italian: svelto = quick, brisk, fast, slender etc hence Modern Greek σβέλτος = quick, swift, lively, nimble etc As for 'other tips', consider the ...
sunny112358's user avatar
1 vote

Svelte as a product name, are there any similar sounding negative words in other languages?

Basically, no. You would first need a massively-multilingual dictionary which really covers all of the words in each language, and there isn't such a thing. You can always decide, at your peril, to ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.1k
1 vote

Do bilinguals and multilingual native speakers make language mistakes?

This is interesting question. I'm sorry to post here, but I'd like to share my experience. I do speak three languages fluently, and those three are from different language categories; Japanese, ...
Cabemanis's user avatar

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